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Isn't that great! My favourite thing in Tate Modern is ... flies awy from the centre... can't find a picture though.

I haven't been to the Tate Modern recently. I went soon after it opened, and I was deeply disappointed by ... glorious turbine hall, but the exhibits were all in the little office rooms. Are they using the space better now?

Didn't you think that the three towers by Louise Bourgeois were a stunning use of the space? I did, although I was too much of a wimp to climb up. Things have been a bit hit and miss since but I was very sorry to miss the sunlight installation.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
It may have been half full of sand, but it was half empty of water, gold and/or moon dust.

It was entirely empty of those things. But only half empty of sand.

So it was.

David
==
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I am doubly pleased, then - just dredging up the ... fitvery well. I suppose I just don't have sufficient talent.

My suspicious Engineer's mind did wonder at the time whether he had laid the items around the edges of a cubic mould and then filledthe inside of the cube with smaller items. That's how I would do it,but then I'm not an artist.

Judging from the dead-cow bloke's (Damian Dewhurst?) techniques, our man probably did get it done by an engineer. An artist these days is far too busy doing media interviews and lunching with wealthy patrons to actually work out how to execute his brilliant ideas.

Mike.
We had that experience too. Was it Marlborough?

I don't remember where it was. It was a good coach ride from Guildford, where I was then at school, and Marlborough would fit. There were a lot of trees around.

Wasn't it Radley? I'm sure we met them for rowing, and al fresco Greek plays in their very own amphitheatre.

Mike.
I haven't been to the Tate Modern recently. I went ... little office rooms. Are they using the space better now?

Didn't you think that the three towers by Louise Bourgeois were a stunning use of the space? I did, although ... up. Things have been a bit hit and miss since but I was very sorry to miss the sunlight installation.

They weren't there. I'm sure I would have noticed if they had been. I cannot now remember when I went. If I had to guess, I would say November
2000 - I was certainly in London then, staying with the friend I visitedthe Tate with, but I have visited her many times, so I could be wrong.

Fran
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Didn't you think that the three towers by Louise Bourgeois were a stunning use of the space? I did, although ... up. Things have been a bit hit and miss since but I was very sorry to miss the sunlight installation.

It was a total waste of (the) space. A bit of dry ice and a huge round bulkhead light, as I recall.
I kept the accompanying pamphlet for a while as a prize-winning example of woolly flannel posing as wisdom, but what's the point? It's not as though such guff is rare or unusual.
I do like the restaurant on the top floor, though.

Mickwick
Europa: Gesellschaft, nicht Gemeinschaft!
Didn't you think that the three towers by Louise Bourgeois ... but I was very sorry to miss the sunlight installation.

It was a total waste of (the) space. A bit of dry ice and a huge round bulkhead light, as I recall.

Really? I feel less deprived then. I read all sorts of guff about life-changing experiences.
I kept the accompanying pamphlet for a while as a prize-winning example of woolly flannel posing as wisdom, but what's the point? It's not as though such guff is rare or unusual. I do like the restaurant on the top floor, though.

I love the unexpected views of St Pauls as you pass the windows. These gave a particularly good contrast when viewing the Hopper exhibition. Odd thing about Hopper: he painted lots of pictures of scenes looking through windows but he never painted the glass in.

The ground floor restaurant isn't bad either.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
It was a total waste of (the) space. A bit of dry ice and a huge round bulkhead light, as I recall.

Really? I feel less deprived then. I read all sorts of guff about life-changing experiences.

There were a lot people lying on the floor when I was there.

Because of the mirror! I forgot that. The most important - and presumably life-changing - feature was a big mirror on the ceiling. This symbolised ... Sorry. I've forgotten. I should have kept the pamphlet.

Did you see the video-tape of the naked man punching himself in the face? I think he was wearing a Bugs Bunny head or something similarly life-changing.
I know. It's very boring and trite to attack contemporary art but it *is* largely paid for with public money and ... yawn.

One must be careful not to express outrage, though. The daring little Establishmentistas thrive on outrage.
I do like the restaurant on the top floor, though.

I love the unexpected views of St Pauls as you pass the windows. These gave a particularly good contrast when viewing the Hopper exhibition. Odd thing about Hopper: he painted lots of pictures of scenes looking through windows but he never painted the glass in.

Are you sure about that?
The ground floor restaurant isn't bad either.

ObAUE: Wasn't the sunlight thing an intervention rather than an installation? Or is that no longer current jargon? In the '80s, interventions were large-scale modifications of public spaces where the existing room, street, city, whatever was an important part of the experience (I think) whereas installations were more or less self-contained whatevers (I think).

Mickwick
Europa: Gesellschaft, nicht Gemeinschaft!
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I haven't been to the Tate Modern recently. I went ... little office rooms. Are they using the space better now?

Didn't you think that the three towers by Louise Bourgeois were a stunning use of the space? I did, although ... up. Things have been a bit hit and miss since but I was very sorry to miss the sunlight installation.[/nq]The best part of that was that they'd installed a huge mirrored ceiling. The day I went loads of people were lying on their backs beneath it, waving to their own reflections seemingly hundreds of feet above their heads. OK, OK, I did too, a good cure for museum legs. I wasn't quite as disappointed by the weather thing as Mickwick, and I'd seen stuff by the same artist at the Biennale the year before (like you do) - photos amongst those at http://tinyurl.com/ag4ce - but it wasn't a patch on the Anish Kapoor exhibition; a single sculpture which filled the whole Turbine Hall space.

The sheer scale of the thing was amazing, with huge curves of red stretching across your whole field of vision. It felt a lot like being an insect crawling into a vast flower. Missed the Bourgeois sadly.
DC
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