Dear all,
I want to know if high school students in the US, Canada, or Britain learn the following sort of English. If so, is it a obligatory school subject or optional one?
Tham cynge licoden peran.
I'd appreciate your reply.
Ray
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Dear all, I want to know if high school students in the US, Canada, or Britain learn the following sort of English. If so, is it a obligatory school subject or optional one? Tham cynge licoden peran. I'd appreciate your reply. Ray

I have never seen this available even as an option in a British school (which isn't to say it doesn't happen somewhere).
Regards,
Arfur
Dear all, I want to know if high school students in the US, Canada, or Britain learn the following sort of English. If so, is it a obligatory school subject or optional one? Tham cynge licoden peran.

Oh, no! Deary me. That's too much to expect, even when you've got a cynge.
No, things are much to Politically Correct these days, and the Normans have had it all round, what with their being kings (or queens) and all. No, proper Englisc is just not taught at all. It's all Frenchified nowadays, in honor of her majesty.
I'd appreciate your reply. Ray

Close to a king yourself.
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Dear all, I want to know if high school students in the US, Canada, or Britain learn the following sort of English. If so, is it a obligatory school subject or optional one? Tham cynge licoden peran. I'd appreciate your reply.

"Pam kynge licoden peran" here:
http://www.ling.ed.ac.uk/linguist/issues/14/14-2226.html

Waste of space IYAM.

Adrian Smith
I want to know if high school students in the US, Canada, or Britain learn the following sort of English. If so, is it a obligatory school subject or optional one? Tham cynge licoden peran.

As posted earlier, this appears to be "Early English."

Fifty years ago the high school curriculum in Britain (as indicated by Oxford & Cambridge Joint Board
GCE examinations at Ordinary levell) included Chaucer's English (1400 Canterbury Tales preface and one tale). At that date I believe Canadian and US students did not tackle Chaucer in the original at high school, only at university (where some famous pre-Chaucerian material, e.g. Gawain and the Green Knight were also on the curriculum.)
The classic English curriculum of 1950 divided
pre-Shakespearean English into three periods:

1 = Anglo-Saxon (as in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle)
2 = Early English (Piers Plowman, The Pearl etc.)
3 = English of Chaucer, Malory and their period.

Students specializing in English were obliged to
show they could read and understand all these
languages. Others were not. It seems unlikely
that British high schools nowadays read Chaucer
in the original (but I am guessing here.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
I want to know if high school students in the ... obligatory school subject or optional one? Tham cynge licoden peran.

As posted earlier, this appears to be "Early English." Fifty years ago the high school curriculum in Britain (as indicated by Oxford & Cambridge Joint Board GCE examinations at Ordinary levell) included Chaucer's English (1400 Canterbury Tales preface and one tale).

I'm not sure we studied Chaucerian English (language), though. Admittedly I took O-level English (Language and Literature, separately, but Chaucer counted as Literature) a mere 47 years ago, and things might have changed in three years, but my memory of studying Chaucer at that level was that we read him in translation. I'm fairly sure I didn't read Chaucer in the original until undergraduate level, though I could be misremembering.

(It's conceivable that I still have my O-level papers in a battered leather suitcase in our attic. I rather hope someone else will be along in a minute to confirm or refute my recollection, so that I won't have to go and rootle around up there looking for them.)

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
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As posted earlier, this appears to be "Early English." Fifty ... included Chaucer's English (1400 Canterbury Tales preface and one tale).

I'm not sure we studied Chaucerian English (language), though. Admittedly I took O-level English (Language and Literature, separately, but Chaucer ... confirm or refute my recollection, so that I won't have to go and rootle around up there looking for them.)

Rootle by all means if you care to. I find myself unable to remember the urgent errand that I had to do today that made me insist that my husband should leave the car for me, but I have a very clear memory of studying Chaucer for O level Eng Lit in 1961 using Neville Coghill's translation. I am fairly sure that we also examined the original text at some point but never had to get to grips with it in any detail.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
I'm not sure we studied Chaucerian English (language), though. Admittedly ... to go and rootle around up there looking for them.)

Rootle by all means if you care to. I find myself unable to remember the urgent errand that I had ... also examined the original text at some point but never had to get to grips with it in any detail.

I am a little younger than my esteemed female compatriots. My grammar school O-level English Literature and Language courses (1972) did not include any Chaucer, nor any early English language. Shakespeare was the earliest we studied.

David
==
replace usenet with the
Rootle by all means if you care to. I find myself unable to remember the urgent errand that I had ... also examined the original text at some point but never had to get to grips with it in any detail.

I know that I didn't study Chaucer (original or translation) for my English Lit O-Level, although my friends who took A-Level English did. For O-Level, we had "Animal Farm" and Hardy's "The Trumpet Major" (the most boring novel ever written).
We also had to study half of a collection of 19th and 20th century poetry. Unfortunately, we spent the autumn term studying the wrong half of the book. When we took the exam, I didn't even recognise the poem we had to write about.
Fran
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