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Could you tell me, please, which one of the following two questions is

1) the most correct form to ask?

2) the most used by people?

"Have I to do (something)?"

"Do I have to do (something)"

Thank you in advance,

Eladio
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"Do I have to..." is for more common, at least in American English. If you say "Have I to..." in the US, it would sound odd. "Must I..." is slighly less odd. But only slightly.
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Hi,

"Have I to do (something)?" Correct, but uncommon.

"Do I have to do (something)" Correct and much, much more common. Say it this way.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you Barb and Clive for your comments. NOW using present perfect, and according to your anwers, I think it should be much more common too to say: "Do you have ever had to go to hospital?" than "Have you ever had to go to hospital?". Am I right?

Clive: I sent to you an email on Wednesday. Did you receive it? Subject: Havana

Eladio
No. "Have you ever had to go to hospital?" is correct. The first sentence is incorrect, and might not even be understood.

The reason is that 'do' is an auxiliary only for the present tense, whereas 'have' is the auxiliary for the present perfect. So, in the present tense we invert "you (do) have to go" to form the question "do you have to go?", and in the perfect tense we invert "you have had to go" to form "have you had to go?" I put the 'do' in brackets because it is commonly omitted in the present tense for non-questions, but almost always included in the question form. That is the reason why "do you have to go?" is much more common than "have you to go?", which is the inverted form of the present tense which omits the 'do'.
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It might be useful to mention here that emphasis plays a big part in the spoken present tense. So you might hear "You DO have to go" if the speaker wants to convey that there is no choice in the matter, and in fact when 'do' is included in a statement it almost implies that emphasis. In a question though, an emphasis would normally fall on the verb, as in "Do you HAVE to go?" Because of this, the 'do' is usually contracted in speech (like many English words ending 'o'). This is indicated sometimes in writing by "D'ya have ta go?" which sounds somewhat similar to "Jafter go?"
Present: I have to go. (have is the main verb)
Add an auxiliary verb (do) in preparation for inversion: I do have to go.
Invert to form a question: Do I have to go?

Present Perfect: I have had to go. (have is an auxiliary verb. had is the main verb in past participle form.)
No addition of an auxiliary is necessary.
Invert to form a question: Have I had to go?

Past: I had to go. (had is the main verb)
Add an auxiliary verb (do) in preparation for inversion: I did have to go. (did is past, just like had in the original)
Invert to form a question: Did I have to go?

Future: I will have to go. (will is an auxiliary verb.)
No need to add an auxiliary verb before inverting.
Invert: Will I have to go?

In short, only the present and past tenses require the addition of do or does (present), or did (past) before inverting.

Forms of be do not add do before inverting: He was ready becomes Was he ready?, not Did he be ready?

CJ
Thank you Demetrius and CalifJim for your extensive and clear comments. What could I do with my doubts and without EF?

CJ: "Past: I had to go. (had is the main verb)" "In short, only the present and past tenses require the addition of do or does (present), or did (past) before inverting"

Now, if I write: "I had made a serious mistake" or "I had to do it"; are the corresponding questions:

Had you made a serious mistake? Or: Did you have made a serious mistake?

Did you have to do it?

Eladio, bothering you again. Sorry and tahnk you in advance!
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Old Eladio
CJ: "Past: I had to go. (had is the main verb)" "In short, only the present and past tenses require the addition of do or does (present), or did (past) before inverting"

Now, if I write: "I had made a serious mistake" or "I had to do it"; are the corresponding questions:

Had you made a serious mistake? Or: Did you have made a serious mistake?

Did you have to do it?

OK. I think that perhaps you have confused some tenses here.

"I had made a serious mistake" uses the pluperfect (or past perfect) tense of the verb 'to make', with 'had' being the auxiliary verb. In this case, the question would be "Had I made a serious mistake?"

"I did make a serious mistake" uses the imperfect (or simple past) tense of the verb 'to make', with 'did' being the auxiliary verb. In this case, the question would be "Did I make a serious mistake?"

"I made a serious mistake" uses the imperfect (or simple past) tense of the verb 'to make', with no auxiliary verb. In this case, the question would be "Did I make a serious mistake?"

"I have made a serious mistake" uses the perfect simple (or present perfect) tense of the verb 'to make', with 'have' being the auxiliary verb. In this case, the question would be "Have I made a serious mistake?"

"I will have made a serious mistake" uses the future perfect tense of the verb 'to make', with 'will have' being the auxiliary. In this case, the question would be "Will I have made a serious mistake?"

"I had had to do it" uses the pluperfect (or past perfect) tense of the verb 'to have', with 'had' being the auxiliary. In this case, the question would be "Had I had to do it?"

"I had to do it" uses the imperfect (or simple past) tense of the verb 'to have' with no auxiliary. In this case, the question would be "Did I have to do it?"

"I did have to do it" uses the imperfect (or simple past) tense of the verb 'to have', with 'did' being the auxiliary. In this case, the question would be "Did I have to do it?"

"I have had to do it" uses the perfect simple (or present perfect) tense, with 'have' being the auxiliary. In this case, the question would be "Have I had to do it?"

"I will have had to do it" uses the future perfect tense of the verb 'to have', with 'will have' being the auxiliary. In this case, the question would be "Will I have had to do it?"
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