+0

Hi

Do you think why is needed in this sentence?

Do you know the reason why she does not like me?

Wouldn't it be better to say?

Do you know the reason why she does not like me?

or

Do you know the reason why she does not like me?

Thanks,

Tom

+2

Say:

Do you know why she doesn't like me?

or

Do you know the reason she doesn't like me?

I prefer the first one.

+1

The wh-word is always preferable at the beginning of an indirect question even though the associated noun is often also possible.

person who
place where
time when
way how
reason why

So the first choice is preferred in each of the following and the last choice is the worst:

Do you know [who / the person / the person who] Robert spoke to about this?
I don't know [where / the place / the place where] the boss went.
Who knows [when / the time / the time when] she left?
Did anyone tell you [how / the way / *] he reacted to the bad news?
Nobody was able to guess [why / the reason / the reason why] she arrived so late.

*the way how is impossible in English.


Special case:

Nobody could have known [what / ?the thing that / ?the thing which] would happen next.

Anything except 'what' is very unusual here.

CJ

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Comments  

CJ, did someone ever tell you that you are a walking encyclopedia of English grammar? No wonder Mister Micawber has always been so complimentary about your varied skills in the language.

Regards,

Tom

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Mr. TomCJ, did someone ever tell you that you are a walking encyclopedia of English grammar?

No, but what else would you expect of someone who has been speaking English for 135 years? Emotion: big smile

CJ