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(Snip)>

She left her Doc Martens at home, and seems to wear flip-flops all the time these days (snip) Fran

Remember when flip-flops were called thongs. Cheers, Sage (You may now continue with your chat about foreigners.)

Isn't "thong" Strine? Here in Blighty they're flip-flops.

Edward

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Remember when flip-flops were called thongs.

Isn't "thong" Strine? Here in Blighty they're flip-flops.

I grew up in California, and we called them zoris, thongs and flip-flops. Regular cosmopolitan melting-pot, we were. The longer I hang around this group, the more I appreciate having a heritage that had more than one name for things.
Since my dad called them zoris, I assumed that that came from his Navy years, from time spent in Japan and various Pacific locations.

I imagine the "thong" use has been driven out by the modern underwear word, but I haven't spent enough time in the States to be sure.

Best Donna Richoux
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They're "thongs" in my dialect. I first heard "flip-flops" when I were in college.

They were thongs when I was growing up, and they were always rubbery things. I started hearing flip-flops when the Asian-style thongs became fashionable. Some people, at least in the L.A. area, also referred to the Asian-style thongs as Jap-slaps.

Dena Jo
(Email: Replace TPUBGTH with denajo2)
on 06 Nov 2003:

Whose zori now? Never heard the word. Japanese? (The word, I mean.)

Yes, it's Japanese. And, yes, *I* remember when they were called "thongs". That was before the hard-boiled egg (1) of ... to place small bowls of hard-boiled eggs on the bar. No one in the know ever ate them, of course.

Ha, just like Ontario when we first arrived there. In that case, it was the curled-up sandwich. I say "the" because it always seemed to be the same one, no matter where you were.
Cheers, Sage
Whose zori now? Never heard the word. Japanese? (The word, I mean.)

Yes, it's Japanese. And, yes, *I* remember when they were called "thongs". That was before the hard-boiled egg (1) of ... to place small bowls of hard-boiled eggs on the bar. No one in the know ever ate them, of course.

Gosh, I wasn't in the know, it appears. I have eaten a bunch of them in my younger days. Tasty! They go well with beer. Others were eating them too.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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They were thongs when I was growing up, and they were always rubbery things. I started hearing flip-flops when the Asian-style thongs became fashionable. Some people, at least in the L.A. area, also referred to the Asian-style thongs as Jap-slaps.

Worse still: at Caltech in the 1950s they were called gookboots. Probably the doing of some Korean War vets.
They have also, at some times & places, been called goaheads, and that is the name under which I still think of them.

Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
They were thongs when I was growing up, and they ... L.A. area, also referred to the Asian-style thongs as Jap-slaps.

Why would Goans wear them on their ... oh, I get it.

Cheers, Sage
No, but I remember when they were called zoris.

Were they the big old vacuum tube (BrE: valve) kind?

I'm afraid that one went right over my head. Care to explain? Even Google didn't help.

Ray Heindl
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They're "thongs" in my dialect. I first heard "flip-flops" when I were in college.

They were thongs when I was growing up, and they were always rubbery things. I started hearing flip-flops when the Asian-style thongs became fashionable. Some people, at least in the L.A. area, also referred to the Asian-style thongs as Jap-slaps.

In Our Own Devices , Edward Tenner lists the names zori, thongs (orig. Australian), flip-flops (orig. from New Zealand), slippers (Hawaii), slaps, flaps, beach walkers, and go-aheads. That should be enough names for one thing.

Ray Heindl
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