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I also used to drink red ones (beer with tomato juice). That was at a different time and in a different place.

Those are "red eyes" in my experience. Some people add vodka.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >If I may digress momentarily from
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >the mainstream of this evening'sPalo Alto, CA 94304 >symposium, I'd like to sing a song

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
I'm afraid that one went right over my head. Care to explain? Even Google didn't help.

Flip-flop is the informal name for one of the possible circuits used to store a binary bit. It has two ... I recall. They can be easily constructed using two vacuum tubes or two transistors. Your dictionary should have the word.

I guess that rates a "d'oh"(1) on my part. For some reason I completely missed the "flip-flops" and assumed you were referring to zori(s). Maybe it's because I've never seen or used a vacuum-tube flip flop, though I have used a few of the solid-state kind. On the other hand, I've never seen a vacuum-tube zori either.
(1) Did I spell that right? My OED is too old to list it.
Ray Heindl
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Yeah, grapefruit juice *is* number one! As for the tomato ... local tavern always had a big pitcher of tomato juice.

When in the US my father also uses salt, on the rare occasions when he drinks a beer rather than ... became older and wiser. Charles Riggs For email, please remove the two capitalized parts in the address that appears

First time I saw salt sprinkled on beer was in Montreal years ago. Nobody could explain why it was done. Each table in the tavern had a salt cellar on it.
So, now I ask, why salt in beer?
Cheers, Sage
In my day, woggles kept themselves on.

They don't make 'em like they used to. Fran

It was all downhill once they started making them of plastic.

Cheers, Sage
snip
First time I saw salt sprinkled on beer was in Montreal years ago. Nobody could explain why it was done. Each table in the tavern had a salt cellar on it. So, now I ask, why salt in beer?

I used to see this I assumed it was to make beer that had gone flat in the glass sparkle momentarily. (Which it did.)

I certainly saw this in Ottawa, but can't recall if it was done in Toronto or Edmonton. (Maybe it's a Western Quebec/Eastern Ontario thing.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
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sage wrote

First time I saw salt sprinkled on beer was in ... on it. So, now I ask, why salt in beer?

I used to see this I assumed it was to make beer that had gone flat in the glass sparkle momentarily. (Which it did.)

It also makes the swill taste a bit better to those who like salty things.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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sage wrote I used to see this I assumed ... gone flat in the glass sparkle momentarily. (Which it did.)

It also makes the swill taste a bit better to those who like salty things.

I first encountered red beer in Lincoln, back in '58. The combination of the acid with the beer had a tendency to kill the foam. I think shaking salt into beer has a similar effect. I didn't like the red beer and I don't like the green stuff, and least of all do I like the salted stuff.
I first encountered red beer in Lincoln, back in '58. The combination of the acid with the beer had a ... the red beer and I don't like the green stuff, and least of all do I like the salted stuff.

I have the luxury of living two doors down from a quiet, pleasant pub, the owner of which before he bought the pub was a partner in a small local brewery. He continues to stock their various beers, and knows how to keep real ale the way it should be kept. (The brewery is larger than a pub-level operation but is still small; wins a lot of prizes.)
Salted beer, green beer and red beer all sound like "beer for people who dislike beer". A well-kept bitter beats all comers.

(I emigrated for better winter weather and better beer and (contrary to various myths) found both.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
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No, but I remember when they were called zoris.

Were they the big old vacuum tube (BrE: valve) kind? Charles Riggs

Well stap me vitals, there it is in my copy of the fourth edition of Frederick Emmons Terman's "Electronic and Radio Engineering", published in
1955 as part of the McGraw-Hill Electrical and Electronic EngineeringSeries. Sec. 8-15, page 633 shows a very clear circuit diagram complete with valves (or toobs, if you will). On page 660, one is told how "the Eccles-Jordan (flip-flop) circuit can be used as a scaler" or counter.

Terman cost me four pounds, one and six.
Those were the days. It was about then that I first encountered the other flip-flops, as well.
Cheers, Sage
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