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To you, maybe, Coop. Not to me; I wouldn't use ... (Rey) Aman a "foreigner"? I consider him a Fellow American.

I'm not all that familiar with Rey's personal history (prior to the published parts), but if he came to this country from another country he was a foreigner.

I'd say he was "from another country".
After he'd been here for quite some time, he became a foreign-born person.

He was always a foreign-born person.
He became a "Fellow American" after he acquired citizenship, but he remains a foreign-born American.

I consider him a Fellow American regardless of what his citizenship is. As I've tried to explain here once or twice, "American" doesn't quite mean "possessing American citizenship"; it's entirely conceivable that you might have a foreign-born person who never (FWROO) attained citizenship, yet who is entirely Americanized (WTM).
The term "foreigner" no longer applied when he became so Americanized that he was not discernable as foreign-born to the casual acquaintance.

I have no idea whether that's true in Rey's case.
If there are errors in accuracy in the above in Rey's particular case, ignore then and look at what is written as an example. Also, as far as I know, Skitt is a foreign-born Fellow American.

Sure. You can't get more American than Skitt, whatever you might think of his views on comma usage.
Is your DIL a "foreigner"? You've been quick, in the past, to emphasize her being Russian.

Certainly. She was born in Russia, she is not a citizen, and she has only been on these shores for a few years.

Really.
As with Rey above, she will progress to "foreign-born" and then to "Fellow American". Nikolai, however, is an American.

Well, it's a lot better than "Tyler" or "Dakota". Sound. No chance of the family moving back to Mother Russia? BTW, have they considered settling in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn (Fourth Largest City in America)?
For me, to be called a foreigner, one has to speak a different language. I don't regard Americans and Australians etc. as foreigners. What are others' views on this subject?

I don't use the word that way; I know that a citizen of a foreign country is a foreigner. But emotionally, sure, I think of Brits & Canucks & Ozzies as "not really foreigners". I am an Anglophone exceptionalist. I feel that, spiritually, we were all descended from yeomen instead of peasants.
Maybe there's actually something to it.

Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
(snip)

I'd include ex-pats like myself

long-term ex-pats with dual citizenship

(The snips are there only to justify a thread drift.) I used the term "ex hyphen pats" in an ... stopped being a patriot. We compromised on my offering him a drink or two; wanna split this between us, Harvey?

Nope: I don't think you owe him that drink, meself.

My definition of "unnecessary" as applied to hyphens is much narrower than that used by the hunters-down of what (to me) is a preferred orthhography.
(I refuse to accept that "ex-patriate" doesn't exist.)

His round!

Cheers,
Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
That's what he was, but that's not what he would have been called. Right off the boat, so to speak, he was a foreigner. The foreigner labels fades as the person becomes Americanized. The foreign-born label stays as long as there is any vestige of accent or cultural giveaway.
He became a "Fellow American" after he acquired citizenship, but he remains a foreign-born American.

I consider him a Fellow American regardless of what his citizenship is.

No you wouldn't. Not if he were someone not known to you personally in some aspect.
As I've tried to explain here once or twice, "American" doesn't quite mean "possessing American citizenship";

I don't care how many times you try to explain it. It's wrong.
it's entirely conceivable that you might have a foreign-born person who never (FWROO) attained citizenship, yet who is entirely Americanized (WTM).

"Americanized" and "American" are two entirely different words. They don't mean the same thing. In many cases, they don't even mean close to the same thing.
The foreign-born label stays as long as there is any vestige of accent or cultural giveaway.

It also stays as long as it remains a fact that the person was born in a foreign country. Duh.
\\P. Schultz
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The foreign-born label stays as long as there is any vestige of accent or cultural giveaway.

It also stays as long as it remains a fact that the person was born in a foreign country. Duh.

The label, Schultzie-pie, the label. If there is no accent or cultural giveaway, there is no label to identify the person as foreign-born. It's not a real hard concept to grasp if you work at it.
For me, to be called a foreigner, one has to speak a different language. I don't regard Americans and Australians etc. as foreigners. What are others' views on this subject?

I have never felt more 'foreign' than when I was in Northern Ireland in the early 60s.

Rob Bannister
It also stays as long as it remains a fact that the person was born in a foreign country. Duh.

The label, Schultzie-pie, the label.

Yeah, I know. My son has that label. He was born in Europe where I happened to be working, and was brought back as an infant. But all of our friends and acquaintances know he is foreign-born. So there is that label for him to deal with. And it will never go away. It's sad. I guess.
\\P. Schultz
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
For me, to be called a foreigner, one has to ... etc. as foreigners. What are others' views on this subject?

I have never felt more 'foreign' than when I was in Northern Ireland in the early 60s.

There have been times when I have been a foreigner in my own house everybody else speaking Tagalog, and such.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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