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on 03 Nov 2003:
Hehe, I'd be careful with the word "alien". I know ... it's how my dad would say it! Different to what?

Oy! (It's "than" "different THAN".)

Oy, oy, oy! No, no, no! It's "from" "different FROM".
"Matt Davis" (Email Removed)
For me, to be called a foreigner, one has to speak a different language. Idon't regard Americans and Australians etc. as foreigners. What are others'views on this subject?

I think of Australians and New Zealanders as 100% British, whether or not they actually like to be regarded as such. They suddenly become foreigners during cricket Test Matches, but revert to being British a few days after they have finished beating us.The Australians will always be British, even after they finally succeed in dumping the Queen and becoming a Republic. The Irish are non-foreigners, but they're defiinitely not British either. You only have to meet one to see what I mean. It's difficult to fit the Irish into any category at all, in this respect. US Americans are easy to classify, they're 100% foreign. Canadians are 50% British, and 50% foreign in the mould of the US Americans. Welsh-speakers are British, except for the small enclave in Argentina, who are foreigners.
Richard Chambers Leeds UK.
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So what does it mean to you, to be an American? It obviously includes the risk of deportation; detention without ... by); and spending hours in line outside the immigration office. That last one always makes me think about going home.

Where is "home," to you?

SML, just curious
ess el five six zero at columbia dot edu
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On 3 Nov 2003 16:18:42 GMT, CyberCypher
on 03 Nov 2003:

Oy, oy, oy! No, no, no! It's "from" "different FROM".

Oy! was being Oy!ronic.

Ross Howard
snip
That last one always makes me think about going home.

Where is "home," to you?

I've always found that an interesting signifier for those of us who live "elsewhere".
I think I stopped referring to Canada as "back home" after about 15 years residence here, but it didn't disappear from my vocabulary until a couple of years ago. (I'm not entirely sure it has: it's certainly almost gone, but it wouldn't surprise me if it popped out at some point.)
I'd be interested to know how long it took for the expression to disappear from the subconscious vocabulary of other expatriates.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
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For me, to be called a foreigner, one has to ... etc. as foreigners. What are others' views on this subject?

I have never felt more 'foreign' than when I was in Northern Ireland in the early 60s.

Back in the late 70s we opened an office in Venezuela. One of the men who moved there was married to a Canadian. She remarked that for the decades she lived in the US she had always thought of herself as a foreigner, but she had never known what "foreign" was until she got off of that airplane at La Guaira (the airport of Caracas).

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam is too much.
On 03 Nov 2003, Sara Moffat Lorimer wrote

snip

Where is "home," to you?

When I am in Connecticut, England is home; when I'm in England, Connecticut is home. Essentially, "home" is no longer a place that really exists, since my mother is no longer really around any longer, and my childhood home belongs to someone else.
I've always found that an interesting signifier for those of us who live "elsewhere". I think I stopped referring to ... be interested to know how long it took for the expression to disappear from the subconscious vocabulary of other expatriates.

My mother never stopped referring to Holland(1) as "home", despite living in England for close to sixty years, and despite being a British citizen for most of those years.
Fran
(1) She never stopped referring to it as "Holland", either, even though she came from Noord Brabant.
On 03 Nov 2003, Sara Moffat Lorimer wrote

snip

Where is "home," to you?

I've always found that an interesting signifier for those of us who live "elsewhere". I think I stopped referring to ... be interested to know how long it took for the expression to disappear from the subconscious vocabulary of other expatriates.

Who, me? Well, I've had several stints at expatriateness, and the most recent one has been since April (or longer, if you count all time spent in Connecticut as being expatriate time). But "home" is still th'East Coast, more specifically New York (Largest City in America.

You know, I used to think about moving out to th'West Coast, until that posting by Kirsh concerning pizza. Actually, though, I once had mediocre but acceptable New York-style pizza in San Francisco (That Great City To The North).
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R F filted:
You know, I used to think about moving out to th'West Coast, until that posting by Kirsh concerning pizza. Actually, though, I once had mediocre but acceptable New York-style pizza in San Francisco (That Great City To The North).

Not surprising...it wouldn't be much of a stretch to say that San Francisco is an East-Coast city that happens to be on the West Coast..r
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