1 3 4 5  7 8 9 15
Back in the late 70s we opened an office in Venezuela. One of the men who moved there was married ... had never known what "foreign" was until she got off of that airplane at La Guaira (the airport of Caracas).

A fancy word for a foreigner is a 'peregrine' (they peregrinate).
on 04 Nov 2003:
on 03 Nov 2003:

Oy, oy, oy! No, no, no! It's "from" "different FROM".

Oy! was being Oy!ronic.

Oh. Glad to hear it. :-)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
A fancy word for a foreigner is a 'peregrine' (they peregrinate).

I thought that was a kind of falcon.

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam is too much.
On 03 Nov 2003, Sara Moffat Lorimer wrote

snip

Where is "home," to you?

I've always found that an interesting signifier for those of us who live "elsewhere". I think I stopped referring to ... be interested to know how long it took for the expression to disappear from the subconscious vocabulary of other expatriates.

I can time it exactly. It occurred on my one trip back to Europe in
1983. I was on a plane, going from London to the South of France, and Iremember thinking "I wish this plane was (sic) taking me home". That was the first time I had consciously thought of Australia as home and on my return, I took immediate steps to get naturalised. Like you, the word 'home', referring to the country of my birth, still slips into my speech occasionally, but rarely. (Oh, the answer: nine years).

Rob Bannister
R F filted:

You know, I used to think about moving out to ... pizza in San Francisco (That Great City To The North).

Not surprising...it wouldn't be much of a stretch to say that San Francisco is an East-Coast city that happens to be on the West Coast..r

Charles Riggs, an admirer of that City, has expressed this view. Me, I'd say it's actually an improvement on th'East Coast in a number of respects, though it is, perhaps, missing something.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
For me, to be called a foreigner, one has to speak a different language. I don't regard Americans and Australians etc. as foreigners. What are others' views on this subject?

No, they're just aliens.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
In the United States, my understanding of "foreigner" is as including people from any other country, English-speaking or not, among ... country. At best, it's sort of a domestic country.) But the word "foreigner" isn't used very much in any case.

This explains the signs on some vending machines that say, "No foreign or Canadian coins".

Stefano
A fancy word for a foreigner is a 'peregrine' (they peregrinate).

That one's new to me thanks. Closely related to "pilgrim," I see, the idea of wandering. From Latin per through + agr-, ager land.

Best Donna Richoux
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
.
This explains the signs on some vending machines that say, "No foreign or Canadian coins". Stefano

Well, at 75 cents US ... (and dropping, again, today).

Cheers, Sage
Show more