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(Snip)>

She left her Doc Martens at home, and seems to wear flip-flops all the time these days (snip) Fran

Remember when flip-flops were called thongs. Cheers, Sage (You may now continue with your chat about foreigners.)

Including the French inventor of the thong - Philippe Feloppe.
John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
(on the idea of 'home')

After 30 years in France, my first wife, referring to ... while here in England, she means her house in France.

I've lived some 35 years in France, the vast majority of them absolutely delightful, but 'home' for me will always ... after the sounds and smells and bumps and bruises and touches and tastes of the town where I was born.

Fair enough, David. My elder son was born in England, and I'd guess that he considers the small village in Derbyshire where he grew up as home. He visits his grandmother more often than he visits me! My younger son and grandsons were born in France and consider that as home. But the elder of the grandsons (5) is proud that he's "half English", as he puts it, and his father and (French) mother are ensuring that he, and his brother, 2, eventually grow up totally bilingual and appreciating both countries.

Although I am quite sentimental I consider the place I happen to own and live in as home. At the moment it's here in Hoddesdon. When I lived in France with my family, home was there, with them. My home town is Nottingham, and although I have fond memories of growing up there, and still have a friend or two from our teens, I have no desire to revisit the place at all.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
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(Snip)>

She left her Doc Martens at home, and seems to wear flip-flops all the time these days (snip) Fran

Remember when flip-flops were called thongs.

No. When I was young, they were called "flip-flops".

I think a "thong" was for keeping your woggle on.
Fran
No, they didn't. They sailed from point A to point ... to Plymouth, Devon ... and then to the other place.)

They went to the House of Lords? Damn! Now that explains a whole heap of stuff. John Dean Oxford De-frag to reply

I just didn't want to use the "A" word.
Cheers, Sage
on 06 Nov 2003:
No, but I remember when they were called zoris. Or ... my dictionary. Ray Heindl (remove the Xs to reply)

Whose zori now? Never heard the word. Japanese? (The word, I mean.)

Yes, it's Japanese. And, yes, *I* remember when they were called "thongs". That was before the hard-boiled egg (1) of the same name existed.
(1) In New Jersey, I think it was (but it might have been elsewhere), in order to legally run a tavern, one had to serve food as well as alcoholic drinks. The way most bar owners got around this law was to place small bowls of hard-boiled eggs on the bar. No one in the know ever ate them, of course.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
(Snip)> Remember when flip-flops were called thongs.

No. When I was young, they were called "flip-flops".

They're "thongs" in my dialect. I first heard "flip-flops" when I were in college.
(Snip)> Remember when flip-flops were called thongs.

No. When I was young, they were called "flip-flops". I think a "thong" was for keeping your woggle on.

Although I've never heard it called that, shouldn't it be "your woggle *in*"?

Charles Riggs
(Snip)> Remember when flip-flops were called thongs.

No, but I remember when they were called zoris.

Were they the big old vacuum tube (BrE: valve) kind?
Charles Riggs
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
No. When I was young, they were called "flip-flops".

They're "thongs" in my dialect. I first heard "flip-flops" when I were in college.

Did you float, shivering, on a li-lo ("LiLo"?) at Morecambe or on an inflatable sunbed at Cleveleys?
(I'm trying to see. RF-ishly, if there's some kind of word-internal alliterative pattern here related to pre-Tet lifestyle choices.)

Ross Howard
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