Hello, all.
I am still working on improving my grammar and punctuation!

I read that there are about 46 prepositions used in the English language. I listed them all in a table.
I need to know if there is a set number of conjunctions (including correlative and subordinating conjunctions) used in the English language. Does anyone know if there is a website or book out there that lists them all?
I know that there are an infinite number of nouns and verbs, so I won't be listing them, but I would like to list every preposition, conjunctions, interjection, modal verbs, auxillary verbs, etc to make learning easier. Once I learn them all, along with their grammatical rules of usage, they will all become second nature to me. I can then pass them onto younger siblings and help improve their English grammar!

Let me know if the existence of such a table exists, even if it lists the most commonly used.
Thank you for your continued help and support.Emotion: smile
Inquisitive wrote on 03 Apr 2005:
(snipt)
Yes, they exist. Use Google or some other search engine. enter "English conjunctions" and then, in a separate window, enter "English prepositions". You will find them. They're all basically the same.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
I will have a look for a site that contains a complete set of tables. I haven't found one that contains them all yet, but I'll keep searching! Thank you, CyberCypher. I hope you are well.Emotion: smile
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
(Top-posting fixed.)

}> Inquisitive wrote on 03 Apr 2005:
}> (snipt)
}>
}> Yes, they exist. Use Google or some other search engine. enter "English }> conjunctions" and then, in a separate window, enter "English }> prepositions". You will find them. They're all basically the same.

} I will have a look for a site that contains a complete set of tables. I } haven't found one that contains them all yet, but I'll keep searching! } Thank you, CyberCypher. I hope you are well.Emotion: smile
Come on, you're not going to settle for a TB non-answer, are you?

Here's the list from MM Cyril, SHCJ, in St. Anastasia School in Waukegan, Illinois (circa 1953):
about, above, across, and after;
against, among, around, and at;
before, beside, between, and by;
down, during, except;
for, from, in, and into;
near, of, off, and on;
over, through, to, and toward;
under, up, and with.
(chanted without pauses in one breath; neophytes take one after "except").

Any list you find will be incomplete, because just about anyone can come up with another one. Any complete list you find will be so long as to be useless. This is the list you want. Memorize it.

R. J. Valentine
I will have a look for a site that contains ... keep searching! Thank you, CyberCypher. I hope you are well.Emotion: smile

Come on, you're not going to settle for a TB non-answer, are you? Here's the list from MM Cyril, SHCJ, ... complete list you find will be so long as to be useless. This is the list you want. Memorize it.

Alternatively, you can use one of the non-alphabetized, but singable ones. They're usually set to Common Meter, and so can be sung to any number of tunes, Yankee Doodle being the most obvious in the US. One such presentation follows.
With on for after at by in
Against instead of near between
By off from under down below
Through over up according to
Among amidst around about
With on for after into out
Before behind beside beneath
Towards underneath beyond across

Aaron Davies
Opinions expressed are solely those of a random number generator. "I don't know if it's real or not but it is a myth." -Jami JoAnne of alt.folklore.urban, showing her grasp on reality.
R J Valentine filted:
Here's the list from MM Cyril, SHCJ, in St. Anastasia School in Waukegan, Illinois (circa 1953): about, above, across, and ... complete list you find will be so long as to be useless. This is the list you want. Memorize it.

Then look for others beyond it...some might turn up within this very thread; others grow only along distant shores or behind secret panels..r
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Here's the list from MM Cyril, SHCJ, in St. Anastasia School in Waukegan, Illinois (circa 1953): about, above, across, and ... complete list you find will be so long as to be useless. This is the list you want. Memorize it.

Quoting myself from 2002:
) In a previous discussion of the productivity of English prepositions, ) I put together the following list (with a couple of additions from ) that thread and some others I came across in the OED), dates from MWCD: )
) Before 12th century:
) a(n), about, above, after, along, amidEmotion: storm, amongEmotion: storm, at, ) before, behind, beneath, between, betwixt, beyond, but, by, ) ere, for, from, in, into, of, off, on, over, through, till, ) to, toward(s), under, underneath, with, without )
) 12th century:
) within
)
) 13th century:
) against, anent, as, beside, like, near, out, throughout, ) until, upon, worth
)
) 14th century:
) around, besides, considering, down, during, except(ing), ) notwithstanding, past, per, sans, save, twixt, unto )
) 15th century:
) aboard, athwart, barring, concerning, contra, despite, less, ) minus, the, versus
)
) 16th century:
) up (1509), since (1530), than (1560), below (1575), onto ) (1581), a la (1589), across (1591), unlike (1593) )
) 17th century:
) aslant (1602), round (1602), pending (1642) (although it ) meant "during"), qua (1647), atop (1655), plus (1668) )
) 18th century:
) re (1707), astride (1713), bar (1714), vice (1750), ex ) (1755), vis-a-vis (1755), opposite (1758), via (1779), ) inside (1791), alongside (1793)
)
) 19th century:
) outside (1826), pro (1837), circa (1861), pace (1864), ) regarding (1866), modulo (1897)
)
) 20th century:
) apropos (1910), following (1926), upside (1929), absent ) (1945), anti (1953)
)
) This doesn't count multi-word prepositions like "on top of" or ) "according to". A list that includes those can be found at )
) http://grammar.englishclub.comĀ­/prepositions-list.htm
The OED has a bunch more (391 in total), mostly obsolete.