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A story is the retelling of an event, both fictional and nonfictional.

A story is the retelling of an event, either fictional or nonfictional.

Do both have the same meaning?

Which is preferred?

Thanks
Comments  
I would use only the second because an event can be either fictional or true. (unless, of course, you're mixing elements of a true story with fiction)
There's a difference between "and" & "or"
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But the conjoins can be either mutually exclusive or combinatory with 'both x and y' constructions.
English 1b3But the conjoins can be either mutually exclusive or combinatory with 'both x and y' constructions.

This is not normally true. Could you provide an example of this usage?

Both fictional and non-fictional events can be depicted in a story.

Here I don't see a problem using both but, to me, both doesn't work well in your sentence.
IvanhrThis is not normally true. Could you provide an example of this usage?
Certainly.

It is a characteristic of reduced clauses, both adverbial and relative.=segregatory meaning.

I saw the huge crowd, both angry and upset at the referees decision.=combinatory meaning.

In my sentence, I should have written:

Stories are the retelling of events, both fictional and nonfinctional.

Now that we have plural events, do you agree that the meaning is segregatory?
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English 1b3
IvanhrThis is not normally true. Could you provide an example of this usage?

In my sentence, I should have written:

Stories are the retelling of events, both fictional and nonfinctional.

Now that we have plural events, do you agree that the meaning is segregatory?

The way I see it, plural has nothing to do with that. I couldn't find that segregatory meaning/explanation for 'both' in any dictionary. So I would advice against using 'both' in this sense even if it existed. Sentences like that are ambiguous at best, and in my opinion, there's not much point in making things even more complicated than they're already are. Sorry I couldn't be of more help on this one.

English 1b3Do both have the same meaning?
The first one suggests that the story includes both aspects, therefore it is some sort of a mixture of these things.
The second one brings indifference of some variety. It sounds like the author doesn't care about truthfulness of the story whether it is made up of real facts or it's fiction.

They sound quite the same to me without any additional context. And, going along with Ivan, you shouldn't complicate matters when possible.
Segregatory is an obscure word to me, although, it is, I believe, connected with the verb "to segregate" meaning "to set apart".
Hi, Fandorin

Please see my second post on this thread. The first post is incorrect.

Thanks
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