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Hi, Emotion: smile

I'm really the dumbest Emotion: stick out tongue, I posted here a grammar question by mistake, but I didn't manage to delete it. I don't know why, there was no "delete icon." Since I wasn't able to delete this post, I made it an "audio and pronounciation" question! And the first question that came to my mind was: "Do you guys understand Black English (that is Ebonics or AAVE)?" I can't understand a word when I listen to hip-hop songs or when I hear black guys talking. That's a strange accent, yet maybe if they spoke slowly I would be able to understand something.

So, do you understand Black English?

By the way, I already asked this question in a chat room once and it turned out that AAVE is generally difficult to understand, unless you have lived among people who speak it.

I'll wait for your replyes. Emotion: smile
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Comments  (Page 2) 
But let's suppose you're walking down a street, you come across a black guy and you want to ask him something.
I see you are unfamiliar with California, at least the suburban neighborhood of it that I live in!
Nobody walks! Everybody drives everywhere!
But, for the sake of argument, let's say I'm walking. The probability of misunderstanding in that situation is, in my estimation, less than 5%.

CJ
I get a bit irritated when they pronounce ask as ax. Last time, there was a white lady came to my workplace with her daughter, and the daughter asked her something. She said, "Mom, could you ax them?" The little girl got scolded right away. "Incorrect English. It's ask" Emotion: smile
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SimplyblessedwithloveI get a bit irritated when they pronounce ask as ax. Last time, there was a white lady came to my workplace with her daughter, and the daughter asked her something. She said, "Mom, could you ax them?" The little girl got scolded right away. "Incorrect English. It's ask" Emotion: smile
I know personally for me it is hard for people to understand that I am saying "ask" and not "ax". My accent makes it sound like "ax" so I always have to emphasis on the "k" sound to much sure everyone hears it right.
This discussion in interesting.

First, regarding "ax" - this is found in a lot of places, not just in Black English. Middle-class whites from Kingston, New York will say it.

The other thing to know about Black English is that if you had never studies languages or linguistics, it's very possible that you would not know that there is such a thing as Black English. My father grew up in the American South and when I was telling him about it, he thought it was nonsense, and that it was just examples of people speaking sub-standard English. He refused to believe that it has its own grammatical structure. I don't think he is at all unique in this. So to a person who is just listening to speach for information and not delivery, it sounds like non-standard English. The chance of mis-understanding the content then is therefore very, very low.
Hi, I dont understan it either! but, I dont bother since one of my english teacher talled me that it is an accent of "Low schooling" people.
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That's more than I can say for you, Anon.
No I actually fount this post because I am having such a difficult time understanding the very southern white and black ppl in my city . I was not " raised in these here parts lol " so I already stick out "like a sore thumb" with my fashion etc...( trust me no one cares about that here lol they think Sears is couture ). If anyone can help me learn to at least understand these ppl I would be so happy Emotion: smile
i don't understand black English or hip-hop/rap either. they talk about one thing then go to talk about something diffrent. this is why i listen to classic rock-metal. examples: linkin park,three days grace, nirvana, guns n roses, Metallica,and Alice and chains. i don't really know why they talk like that when most were born in america.
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