re: "Do You Know" page 2

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The Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (as that really what it's called) is totally wrong on this one.

Without seeing the definition, I don't know whether it's totally wrong. I would certainly agree that if something is a "field" then it's not a "yard". But the tarmac area, used for football etc., at my primary school (which didn't have a grass "playing field") was indeed called a "yard". (This was Sheffield in the 1980s, if that's relevant.)
Jonathan
btw, What's this about some Brits calling a field a "yard"?? Never heardit.

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (and my students), the term "yard" is used in British English to refer to the place at a school where the students go to play soccer and the like (we always called this a "field"). -Chris

The Northern English viewpoint. If it's got a hard surface such as tarmac you can call it a yard, but never a field. If it's grassed, then you can call it a field but never a yard.
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btw, What's this about some Brits calling a field a "yard"?? Never heard it.

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (and my students), the term "yard" is used in British English to refer to the place at a school where the students go to play soccer and the like

I don't think this term is commonly used, and when it is it does not refer to the grassed part of the school grounds, but to the tarmacked part.
Adrian
I don't think this term is commonly used, and when it is it does not refer to the grassed part of the school grounds, but to the tarmacked part.

I don't think I'd try to write that sentence. The material is "tarmac". I don't know if you put tarmac down if you've "tarmaced" it or "tarmacked" it. I think it's the same material as macadam and just tar and rocks. That's easier: macadamized it.
btw, What's this about some Brits calling a field a "yard"?? Never heard it.

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (and my students), the term "yard" is used in British English to refer to the place at a school where the students go to play soccer and the like (we always called this a "field"). -Chris

We certainly used this as children in Wales to refer to the tarmacked area outside school where we played - maybe it's regional and maybe class-based - pace Edward, 'quad' sounds more like an Oxbridge/Public School usage.

But at least one American uses the term 'yard' in exactly this way. I give you Paul Simon's song - "Me and Julio down by the School Yard".

DC
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(Email Removed) posted the following:
But at least one American uses the term 'yard' in exactly this way. I give you Paul Simon's song - "Me and Julio down by the School Yard".

Isn't this a single word "schoolyard"? This seems to me to refer to any of the open areas around a school (the fields and such).

-Chris
Chris Kern filted:
But at least one American uses the term 'yard' in ... song - "Me and Julio down by the School Yard".

Isn't this a single word "schoolyard"? This seems to me to refer to any of the open areas around a school (the fields and such).

Simon's mostly urban upbringing suggests he was thinking of a paved area surrounded by chain-link fence, not the fields of the Elysian sort...the school may have been on the order of the Academy of St Martin in the Parking Lot..

Someone, I think it was Asimov, once published a limerick that rhymed "Juilliard" with "schoolyard" (and with "full yard", supplying the ribaldry necessary for the verse form)...he was not happy with the colleague who pointed out that Juillard doesn't have a schoolyard..r
We certainly used this as children in Wales to refer to the tarmacked area outside school where we played - ... 'yard' in exactly this way. I give you Paul Simon's song - "Me and Julio down by the School Yard".

Not exactly. Julio was doing something illegal. Soccer is not illegal in the US. It is only illegal for us to be good at it.
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But at least one American uses the term 'yard' in ... song - "Me and Julio down by the School Yard".

Isn't this a single word "schoolyard"? This seems to me to refer to any of the open areas around a school (the fields and such).

The schools that I think of that have schoolyards don't have open areas. They are mostly paved areas and surrounded by a fence. Also called "the playground".
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