re: "Do You Know" page 3

  •  63
  •  2,570
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Sounds like you may be suffering from 'in-country syndrome' - ... marked or not. It's happened to me more than once...

What's worse is when you start saying the structures. A few times I've caught myself almost saying "I recommend you to X" (or "I recommended him/her to X") which is very common here.

Just to make sure what my dictionary says that structure is acceptable and used in BrE, isn't it?

Nobuko Iwasaki
Chris Kern:
A few times I've caught myself almost saying "I recommend you to X" (or "I recommended him/her to X") which is very common here.

Nobuko Iwasaki:
Just to make sure what my dictionary says that structure is acceptable and used in BrE, isn't it?

If X is a verb, it's not standard English anywhere; it should be "I recommend that you X" or some similar form. And I think that's what Chris was talking about.
If X is a person or organization, it is standard, although it would then be unusual to see "recommend" in the simple present tense. "I recommended Y to X" here means "I advised X that Y would be a good choice"; X, as I said, could be a person or organization, and Y could be a person (to be hired, say) or a course of action.
Mark Brader > "People tend to assume that things they don't know Toronto > about are either safe or dangerous or useless, (Email Removed) > depending on their prejudices." Tim Freeman

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
But at least one American uses the term 'yard' in ... song - "Me and Julio down by the School Yard".

Isn't this a single word "schoolyard"? This seems to me to refer to any of the open areas around a school (the fields and such).

I agree to me it's a single word and could include either paved or unpaved ground.

Mark Brader, Toronto "Asps. Very dangerous. You go first." (Email Removed) Raiders of the Lost Ark
We certainly used this as children in Wales to refer to the tarmacked area outside school where we played - ... 'yard' in exactly this way. I give you Paul Simon's song - "Me and Julio down by the School Yard".

Yabbut it's a "schoolyard", not a "yard" and it may or may not be paved. The primary school I attended had grassy areas (or rather, they were areas of packed dirt, with some grass) on which we played. That was the schoolyard. Parents evidently became annoyed that our clothes were constantly begrimed as we brought home small portions of said yard each day, so the area was paved eventually, but it remained the schoolyard. I occasionally heard it called a "playground" but never just a "yard." The "yard" I knew about in those days was the one I had to mow periodically.
It seems to me that Harvard has a Yard, but I don't imagine it is entirely paved.

rzed
Chris Kern: Nobuko Iwasaki:

Just to make sure what my dictionary says that structure is acceptable and used in BrE, isn't it?

If X is a verb, it's not standard English anywhere; it should be "I recommend that you X" or some similar form. And I think that's what Chris was talking about.

Hmm. Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English has this under the entry "recommend":
"I recommend you not to disobey your officers."
Taishukan's Genius explains:
She recommended his quitting smoking.
= She recommended that he (should) quit smoking.
= (BrE) She recommended him to quit smoking.
One of Kenkyusha's dictionaries has:
"I recommend that you ((BrE) you to) try this ointment for sunburn."
Those three dictionaries are quite popular among Japanese English learners. No wonder Japanese use this structure often.

I've just googled alt.usage.english with "I recommend you to". This recommend thing has been discussed before and it seems to be one of the pondian differences.
If X is a person or organization, it is standard, although it would then be unusual to see "recommend" in ... be a person or organization, and Y could be a person (to be hired, say) or a course of action.

Nobuko Iwasaki
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The "yard" I knew about in those days was the one I had to mow periodically.

Seems a good moment to ask you good people something I've wondered about on and off for some time... (but we're not talking sleepless nights here)

In the UK houses have 'gardens' - mine's got a front and a back garden. If you have an area of grass that you mow it's a 'lawn'. Working in the garden is 'gardening'.
Which bit does 'yard' and 'yardwork' map on to?
DCC (avoiding gardening or yardwork)
Isn't this a single word "schoolyard"?

A Google reveals the song title is in fact with one word. Interestingly, the song puts the stress on 'yard' - 'me and Julio down by the school ... yard'. I'd guess standard pronunciation of one word 'schoolyard' has the stress on 'school'.
I found the lyrics at http://www.reallyrics.com/lyrics%5CP0010030001.asp . Shouldn't that be " Singing, me and Julio down by the schoolyard"?

DCC
The "yard" I knew about in those days was the one I had to mow periodically.

Seems a good moment to ask you good people something I've wondered about on and off for some time... (but ... Working in the garden is 'gardening'. Which bit does 'yard' and 'yardwork' map on to? DCC (avoiding gardening or yardwork)

This is a blatant attempt to attract Areff's attention and draw him back in.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
The "yard" I knew about in those days was the one I had to mow periodically.

In the UK houses have 'gardens' - mine's got a front and a back garden. If you have an area of grass that you mow it's a 'lawn'. Working in the garden is 'gardening'. Which bit does 'yard' and 'yardwork' map on to?

Our "yard" would seem to be your "garden". We don't typically have a "garden", although especially with a prefixed word, it can be a plot of dirt with stuff planted in it ("flower garden", "vegetable garden", "rose garden") or a gravel/sand area with rocks on it ("rock garden"). If somebody was "working out in the garden", I would assume they were playing with vegetables or flowers, perhaps pruning bushes. "Gardening" is a bit wider and can encompass lawnwork, which would be "working out in the yard".

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >"Revolution" has many definitions.
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >From the looks of this, I'd sayPalo Alto, CA 94304 >"going around in circles" comes

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Show more