re: "Do You Know" page 4

  •  63
  •  2,569
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
I don't think this term is commonly used, and when ... part of the school grounds, but to the tarmacked part.

I don't think I'd try to write that sentence. The material is "tarmac". I don't know if you put tarmac down if you've "tarmaced" it or "tarmacked" it. I think it's the same material as macadam and just tar and rocks. That's easier: macadamized it.

Yes, but (UK) people do say "tarmac(k)ed" even if they would be uneasy about writing it. It's used as an adjective (?participle) as well as a verb: "The old lane is now a tarmac(k)ed road". Or am I mishearing "a tarmac road"? "Macadamiz/sed" is technical language.On the "yard" point, we seem to be resurrecting the yard/garden discussions we sometimes have. "Yard" in BrE implies an enclosed area of paving of some kind, or perhaps solidly-trodden earth. It never in itself means "garden", though a few flowerpots and a statue may transform it into one, A schoolyard is an area where children can play even when they're not allowed to go on to the grass (if any), and the grass can't by definition then be part of the yard.

A quad/quadrangle (Oxford and more generally: Cambridge has "courts") need not be literally four-sided, but is enclosed (or at least feels as if enclosed) by buildings or walls. It often embraces a cherished lawn, paved or gravelled walkways, and perhaps a statue or a fancy sundial at its centre. Even in a school, it will emphatically not be a playing area, and the lawn may be out of bounds.
Alan Jones
Seems a good moment to ask you good people something ... and 'yardwork' map on to? DCC (avoiding gardening or yardwork)

This is a blatant attempt to attract Areff's attention and draw him back in.

Never heard of him. Next?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I don't think I'd try to write that sentence. The ... macadam and just tar and rocks. That's easier: macadamized it.

Yes, but (UK) people do say "tarmac(k)ed" even if they would be uneasy about writing it. It's used as an ... verb: "The old lane is now a tarmac(k)ed road". Or am I mishearing "a tarmac road"? "Macadamiz/sed" is technical language.

You mistake my point. I'm quite willing to accept "tarmacked"/"tarmaced" the road, but quite unwilling to decide if the "k" belongs. That's why I would write a write-around.

My look-up disagrees with macadamized being a technical term. See: http://www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn?stage=1&word=macadam It seems interchangeable with tarmacked/tarmaced.
Tarmac Ltd is a UK firm. It would seem that a "tarmacked"/"tarmaced" road would be a road surfaced by that company. Evidently, in the UK this is not what is seemed.
Yes, but (UK) people do say "tarmac(k)ed" even if they ... am I mishearing "a tarmac road"? "Macadamiz/sed" is technical language.

You mistake my point. I'm quite willing to accept "tarmacked"/"tarmaced" the road, but quite unwilling to decide if the "k" belongs. That's why I would write a write-around.

We're somehow at cross-purposes when in fact we agree - it's the spelling that makes me uneasy, too.
My look-up disagrees with macadamized being a technical term. See: http://www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn?stage=1&word=macadam It seems interchangeable with tarmacked/tarmaced.

In its sense, yes - it's just that I've never heard "macadamized" in UK speech or read it in e.g. the newspapers.
Tarmac Ltd is a UK firm. It would seem that a "tarmacked"/"tarmaced" road would be a road surfaced by that company. Evidently, in the UK this is not what is seemed.

In the UK "tarmac" has gone the same way as "hoover" - it's generic.

Alan Jones
On the "yard" point, we seem to be resurrecting the yard/garden discussions we sometimes have. "Yard" in BrE implies an ... Even in a school, it will emphatically not be a playing area, and the lawn may be out of bounds.

American prisons have yards. I doubt that many prison yards have lawns, although I haven't been in one (knock wood).
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
In the UK "tarmac" has gone the same way as "hoover" - it's generic.

Same here in the USA. From M-W Online: Main Entry: tar·mac Pronunciation: 'tär-"mak Function: noun Etymology: from Tarmac, a trademark : a tarmacadam road, apron, or runway Skitt (in Hayward, California) www.geocities.com/opus731/

Is US tarmac the same thing as "blacktop"?

Ross Howard
In the UK "tarmac" has gone the same way as "hoover" - it's generic.

Same here in the USA. From M-W Online: Main Entry: tar·mac Pronunciation: 'tär-"mak Function: noun Etymology: from Tarmac, a trademark : a tarmacadam road, apron, or runway Skitt (in Hayward, California) www.geocities.com/opus731/

Sorry about the faulty posting format in my previous post.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Same here in the USA. From M-W Online: Main Entry: ... Tarmac, a trademark : a tarmacadam road, apron, or runway

Is US tarmac the same thing as "blacktop"?

Yes, as far as I know.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Show more