re: "Do You Know" page 6

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Django Cat typed thus:
On 27 Feb 2004, Bob Cunningham wrote snip Another pondian ... "touch wood" in the UK rather than "knock/knock on wood".

Oh is that what that Phil Spector song is about? Right!

Dave Edmunds and Rockpile, Shirley?

David
==
In the UK "tarmac" has gone the same way as "hoover" - it's generic.

Same here in the USA. From M-W Online: Main Entry: tar·mac Pronunciation: 'tär-"mak Function: noun Etymology: from Tarmac, a trademark : a tarmacadam road, apron, or runway Skitt (in Hayward, California) www.geocities.com/opus731/

In Australia, that's bitumen (pron. bitchamun) and bitumenized. (Used to be heard in pubs before breathalysers) "One for the road... And one for the ***."

Rob Bannister
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Which, if any, of the following would be the most colloquial way of saying that in AmE, then? 1. We ... back yard with asphalt (FWIW, it'd probably be No. 3 in BrE, or yes, it's been verbed "tarmacked".)

Perhaps other BrE speakers will correct me, but I would have thought 'asphalted the yard', 'tarred or tarmacked the road'. Official BrE (on maps) talks about 'metalled roads'.

Rob Bannister
Perhaps other BrE speakers will correct me,

Yes, I'll do that..
but I would have thought 'asphalted the yard',

No. It's tarmaced (though these days, people often pave the yard call it a patio). Personally I think a patio should have a view over a garden, whereas a yard might not.
'tarred or tarmacked the road'.

That's correct (but it's also used for yards and car-parks).
Official BrE (on maps) talks about 'metalled roads'.

That's only used by Civil Servants, Police, the Military and maybe Scoutmasters, in my experience.

GC
But a roof could be asphalted.
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about "The

You mistake my point. I'm quite willing to accept "tarmacked"/"tarmaced" ... the "k" belongs. That's why I would write a write-around.

We're somehow at cross-purposes when in fact we agree - it's the spelling that makes me uneasy, too.

Fair enough, but, reassuringly, we do have a rule for these cases: words ending in c add a k:
panic - panicked
picnic - picnicked
and so on.
Adrian
Yes, I'll do that.. No. It's tarmaced (though these days, ... a view over a garden, whereas a yard might not.

But a roof could be asphalted.

True. I might even say, "I want some asphalt for the yard" but once it was laid, I'd call it tarmac. Strange but true.

GC
about "The We're somehow at cross-purposes when in fact we agree - it's the spelling that makes me uneasy, too.

Fair enough, but, reassuringly, we do have a rule for these cases: words ending in c add a k: panic - panicked picnic - picnicked and so on.

Who was supposed to have sicced the dogs on the rulebreaker?
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but I would have thought 'asphalted the yard',

No. It's tarmaced (though these days,

I'm probably influenced by the (extremely minor) public school I attended in England, where each of our playgrounds was known as an "assy" (short for "asphalt"), so we had the Chapel Assy, the Main Assy, etc. When the fives courts were pulled down and asphalted, it became the New Assy.
people often pave the yard call it a
patio).

"Paving", to me, implies bricks or flagstones, rather than tarmac.

Rob Bannister
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