re: "Do You Know" page 7

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No. It's tarmaced

I'm probably influenced by the (extremely minor) public school I attended in England, where each of our playgrounds was known ... Chapel Assy, the Main Assy, etc. When the fives courts were pulled down and asphalted, it became the New Assy.

Schools (particularly English Public schools) often have their own specialized usages. At my old school, we referred to the open landing areas outside the dormitories as "the flat". I don't think I've heard that usage anywhere else.

At that same school we had three "quads" which were enclosed areas within the school, then on the outside of the school we had the East and West "lawns" and the North and South "yards". The yards were tarmaced, and people referred to it that way, e.g. "Ball games may only be played on the tarmaced yards".
people often pave the yard call it a patio.

"Paving", to me, implies bricks or flagstones, rather than tarmac.

Yes, sorry if I was unclear, that's what I meant. People put flagstones down instead of the tarmac, and call that a patio.

GC
But a roof could be asphalted.

True. I might even say, "I want some asphalt for the yard" but once it was laid, I'd call it tarmac. Strange but true.

I'd call it tar.
I thought "tarmac" referred to something more complex a layer of big stones, with smaller stones on top, with a layer of tar to hold it together. Do you go to all that trouble for a yard?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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I don't understand why you and Skitt and Merriam-Webster are ... life, I'd expect to hear "asphalt" or "pavement" or "blacktop".

I would too, and those are the words I'd use myself, but many people in the US say 'tarmac' in place of 'asphalt' or 'blacktop'.

I've only heard "tarmac" when referring to airplane runways: "When the Pope got off the plane, he kissed the tarmac", "George Bush's dog pooped on the tarmac before getting on Air Force One", etc. I always assumed that meant that tarmac was a different substance than asphalt, presumably tougher (I imagine potholes would be more dangerous on an airplane runway than on a freeway). But this is all conjecture and probably incorrect.

Kim Scarborough http://www.unknown.nu/kim/ "Those who 'abjure' violence can only do so because others are committing violence on their behalf."
George Orwell
Django Cat typed thus:

Oh is that what that Phil Spector song is about? Right!

Dave Edmunds and Rockpile, Shirley?

Note for the by-now-really-confused STS sufferers: "Knock On Wood" was by Eddie Floyd (on Stax). The Dave Edmunds song (many years before Rockpile, his late '70s band with Nick Lowe) was "I Hear You Knocking".

Ross Howard
I thought "tarmac" referred to something more complex a layer of big stones, with smaller stones on top, with a layer of tar to hold it together. Do you go to all that trouble for a yard?

Yes. What you describe is exactly what is now covering my yard.

GC
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Official BrE (on maps) talks about 'metalled roads'.

That's only used by Civil Servants, Police, the Military and maybe Scoutmasters, in my experience.

And cyclists, in my experience.
That's only used by Civil Servants, Police, the Military and maybe Scoutmasters, in my experience.

And cyclists, in my experience.

And people that build roads.

SAm.
Fair enough, but, reassuringly, we do have a rule for ... k: panic - panicked picnic - picnicked and so on.

Who was supposed to have sicced the dogs on the rulebreaker?

TEPTR
Adrian
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Ross Howard typed thus:
Django Cat typed thus: Dave Edmunds and Rockpile, Shirley?

Note for the by-now-really-confused STS sufferers: "Knock On Wood" was by Eddie Floyd (on Stax). The Dave Edmunds song (many years before Rockpile, his late '70s band with Nick Lowe) was "I Hear You Knocking".

Ah, yes, I hear you knocking. Knock on wood is also James Taylor and Otis Reading among others.

David
==
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