It's very common for Japanese people, when speaking English, to use the "do you know X" construction as a literal translation of "X wo shiiteru?" to ask if you have heard of something or someone.

For instance:
"Do you know Bob Sapp?" (meaning "Do you know who Bob Sapp is?") "Do you know karaoke?" (meaning "Do you know what karaoke is?" or "Have you heard of karaoke?")
To me this sounds unnatural (although in general it's understandable, at least when you get used to it). But I'm always afraid of telling people that something is unnatural without checking it first, because more than once that's bitten me in the ass (for instance when I told a number of people that "yard" is not used to mean "field", only later to find out that "yard" in that sense is a British usage).

So is this dialectical at all or is it just plain "wrong"?

-Chris
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It's very common for Japanese people, when speaking English, to use the "do you know X" construction as a literal ... in that sense is a British usage). So is this dialectical at all or is it just plain "wrong"? -Chris

Sounds like you may be suffering from 'in-country syndrome' - you've been hearing the same ideosyncratic English structure from your students for so long you start doubting your judgement as to whether it's marked or not. It's happened to me more than once...
I don't think there's too much of a problem with structures like 'do you know Paris?' or 'do you know sushi?' or 'do you know Tony Blair?' (to which my response would probably be 'not personally'). These sound even more natural if you miss out the 'do'.
I wonder where your learners are putting the stress? Maybe over 'know'? It's concievable the structure would sound stranger to a native speaker in the mouth of a Japanese speaker than from other groups.

DCC
Sorry- made a knee-jerk assumption you're an English teacher - in-wrong group syndrome strikes again..
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It's very common for Japanese people, when speaking English, to use the "do you know X" construction as a literal ... "yard" in that sense is a British usage). So is this dialectical at all or is it just plain "wrong"?

imo, Wrong.
I think standard English would be (as you suggest) "Do you know who/what ... is?"
"Have you heard of ...?"
or sometimes "Do you know of ...?"
Colloquially, "You know ...?" has the same meaning, as long as it's followed up with something like, "Well, I saw him being arrested outside Tesco last night."
btw, What's this about some Brits calling a field a "yard"?? Never heard it.

Adrian
btw, What's this about some Brits calling a field a "yard"?? Never heard it.

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (and my students), the term "yard" is used in British English to refer to the place at a school where the students go to play soccer and the like (we always called this a "field").
-Chris
btw, What's this about some Brits calling a field a "yard"?? Never heard it.

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (and my students), the term "yard" is used in British English to refer to the place at a school where the students go to play soccer and the like (we always called this a "field").

The Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (as that really what it's called) is totally wrong on this one.

Don Aitken
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It's very common for Japanese people, when speaking English, to ... this dialectical at all or is it just plain "wrong"?

imo, Wrong. I think standard English would be (as you suggest) "Do you know who/what ... is?" "Have you heard ... meaning, as long as it's followed up with something like, "Well, I saw him being arrested outside Tesco last night."

It has always startled me a bit when a supermodel appears on the TV screen and my Filipina wife asks, "Do you know her?" Granted, I feel flattered for a second, until I realize the she's merely doubting my people recognition abilities.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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The Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (as that really what it's called) is totally wrong on this one.

I agree. At school we would play recreational football (soccer) in the quad (presumably short for quadrangle, or possibly quadrilateral), or formal team soccer on a (playing) field. A yard is somewhere a builder stores his bricks prior to attempting to obtain planning permission to turn it into four executive homes.
Edward

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(Email Removed) posted the following:
Sounds like you may be suffering from 'in-country syndrome' - you've been hearing the same ideosyncratic English structure from your students for so long you start doubting your judgement as to whether it's marked or not. It's happened to me more than once...

What's worse is when you start saying the structures.

A few times I've caught myself almost saying "I recommend you to X" (or "I recommended him/her to X") which is very common here.

-Chris
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