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My grammar book says "Do you know any good doctor?" is wrong, and "Do you know a good doctor?" is correct. Is that really true? And how about "Do you know any good doctors?" Is this OK?

My grammar book also says "She hasn't got any job." is wrong, and "She hasn't got a job." is correct. Is that really true? Then how about "She hasn't got any jobs." Is this OK?

Please help me with this and I'd appreciate it.
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Hi,

I would word things the same as your grammar book does. It might be easier to generally think of using "a" with a singular noun (doctor, job) and "any" with a plural noun (doctors, jobs).
But some people on the forum said we can use either singular or plural nouns after "any". Please look at http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/AnyAnimalsAnyAnimal/vwkcz/Post.htm

also here http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/IsThereAnyVsAreThereAny/vdpvg/Post.htm

According to what they said, "Do you know any good doctor?" and "Do you know any good doctors?" seem OK. Therefore I don't know which one should I trust.
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Those are both good discussion threads, Viceidol.

As they suggest, Do you know any good doctor/doctors are both grammatically OK. For the general question, most native speakers would use the plural, soliciting information about any doctors that could help-- the more the better! On the other hand, if the speaker is thinking more of a single doctor (perhaps a specialist) or thinks that there may be only one helpful doctor available, s/he might use the singular-- for instance, 'Do you know any good doctor [that has experience with my rare condition]?

Thank you very much for your explanation!
You are looking for a doctor -- a good doctor:

Do you know a good doctor?
Do you know any good doctors?

______

You are complaining that there are no good doctors. Note the contrast with bad.

-- My doctor isn't very good.
-- My doctor isn't very good either.
-- I think they're all bad.
-- That's probably true. Do you know any good doctor?
(You expect a "no" answer.)
______

The example with job is easier. It's expected that a person has a job or not. It's less expected that a person has more than one job.

She's got a job. She hasn't got a job.
She hasn't got any jobs
is strange because we don't expect someone to have more than one job at a time.
______

any doesn't come into it unless it's a contrast with a certain kind of job.

-- Has she got a job as a teacher?
-- No.
-- Has she got a job as a nurse?
-- No.
-- Has she got a job as a cashier?
-- No. Look, she hasn't got any job.

________

To summarize:
In these contexts, use a (an) with the singular and any with the plural. But use the singular or plural based on the usual practical situation you're talking about. Use any with the singular only in a situation where the focus is on the adjective, not on the noun itself -- as in contrasts of type.

CJ

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CalifJimThe example with job is easier. It's expected that a person has a job or not. It's less expected that a person has more than one job.

She's got a job. She hasn't got a job.
She hasn't got any jobs
is strange because we don't expect someone to have more than one job at a time.

Thank you for your detailed explanation, CalifJim! None of my grammar books ever mention that.

May I ask another question? My grammar book says "She hasn't got any job." is "wrong", and you said "She hasn't got any jobs." is strange, so do you think both "She hasn't got any job." and "She hasn't got any jobs" are inapproreate?

(By the way, this example comes from my grammar book Practical English Usage(Authur:Michael Swan), in entry #54.4. My book is an earlier edition, so I wonder if there are some mistakes about it.)
do you think both "She hasn't got any job." and "She hasn't got any jobs" are inapproreate?
"Inappropriate for what?" is the question. For a very neutral statement that the woman is unemployed, we'd say She hasn't got a job. I have already illustrated a situation where She hasn't got any job might be used, and She hasn't got any jobs is very difficult to contextualize. I don't think anyone says that. So, the short answer is "Yes, I think those are inappropriate".

CJ
People who do freelance work could use "jobs" in the plural like that. Someone like a house painter or... say, a freelance writer.

Lori's a bit short of cash right now. She doesn't have any jobs lined up right now.
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