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I want to work from home on friday. So, I need to tell my supervisor about that.

I want to work from home tomorrow as I am having doctor's /doctor appointment at 10 am.

Please correct it..

- Johnny
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Aren't those verbs called 'stative verbs'?
All of them have to do with human feelings(love, feel etc).
Aren't those verbs called 'stative verbs'?
Not exactly. Private verbs, for example, are non-progressive, but not necessarily stative. We say I think you're right, not I'm thinking you're right, but think is not a stative verb (according to some analysts) because it is a (mental) activity.

Palmer (The English Verb) gives the following taxonomy of non-progressive verbs. Note that 'non-progressive' indicates the usual usage; it doesn't mean you will never see the verb in a progressive tense. Its use in the progressive tenses is simply unusual, and has a special or separate meaning from the more common non-progressive usage.

Non-Progressive Verbs

Stative verbs.
Verbs that indicate the quality of creating sensations (intransitive). (e.g., smell, taste, feel)
Verbs of stance. (e.g., stand, lie, live) (These indicate a temporary state in the progressive.)
Others. (e.g., contain, belong, matter, deserve, consist, please, depend, own)

Private verbs.
Verbs of mental activity. (e.g., think, imagine, hope, plan, forget, believe)
Verbs of sensations (transitive). (e.g., see, hear, smell, taste, feel)

CJ
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Dear Jim,

Let's say that I met an old friend of mine, and he asks me how I'm doing.
I tell him 'I'm doing great, what about you? How do you feel'?
If he answers: 'I'm feeling great', would it be considered a mistake?
Feel is a stative verb--Does it mean that the most correct answer would be I feel great, thank you?

Moreover, you say that private verbs such as think should stay in a non-progressive form, but natives do say: ''I'm thinking about moving out'', no?
WesternAmericanMoreover, you say that private verbs such as think should stay in a non-progressive form, but natives do say: ''I'm thinking about moving out'', no?
Hi, Western!

Take a look at my explanation of the verb "think" in this topic: http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/StativeVerbs/3/bhqk/Post.htm
Hope it helps!
WA: in addition to Loojka's explanation.

Use think in a non-progressive form when you want to say: «My current opinion is that...». This is kinda state of your mind, hence the term "stative verb".

Use "thinking" to express the ongoing action of thinking. For examle:

«Don't disturb me, I am thinking!»

Compare:

1. «I am thinking whether this party is worth going to» — you haven't decided yet — the process.
2. «I think his party is not worth going to» — you have decided — the state.

HTH
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