In a grammar book, it says "His wife is half as old again as he. (=His wife is one and a half times as old as he.) "

I don't understand why it uses the word "again" instead of other words, if any is available. The original sentence doesn't make any sense to me.
Is it a correct way to say "His wife is half as old again as he. (=His wife is one and a half times as old as he.) "?
If not, how should the sentece " His wife is half as old again as he. " be corrected in order to mean "(=His wife is one and a half times as old as he.)" ??
Can anyone help me with this??
Thanks
Casey
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In a grammar book, it says "His wife is half as old again as he. (=His wife is one and ... wife is one and a half times as old as he.)" ?? Can anyone help me with this?? Thanks Casey

That sounds more like something one would see in a math book, but it is correct.
His wife is 1.5 times as old as he is. She's not "half as old as" (he can dream, maybe), and it would be even more awkward to say "His wife is his age plus half his age." ("His age plus half" might imply that she was a half-year older than he, which would be confusing at best, or misleading.) "Half as old again" is a common construction, and it means "the first age plus (again) half of the first age". It might be more commonly seen nowadays as "half again as old".
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In a grammar book, it says "His wife is half as old again as he. (=His wife is one and ... is half as old again as he. (=His wife is one and a half times as old as he.) "?

Yes, it's valid. See the COED. There are some other similar constructions, for example:
"This book costs half as much again as that one"
- meaning the book costs 50% more.
-
If not, how should the sentece " His wife is half as old again as he. "
be corrected in order to mean "(=His wife is one and a half times as old as he.)" ??

There's no need to change it in everyday speech.
T.
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I don't jave COED, what is it?
I am not sure if I understand this "again" useage. Say if the husband is 25 years old.
How old is the wife when I say:
1.) His wife is as old again as he.
2.) His wife is twice/ two times as old again as he.
3.) if I want to sue " as old again as " structure to mean "She istwice as old as he. = She is two times as old as he.= She is two times older than he," then how should I use the "as old again as" to describe what I want to say?
Thank you for whoese who is willing to help me.
Casey
The consfused learner.
I don't jave COED, what is it?

The Concise Oxford English Dictionary.
I am not sure if I understand this "again" useage. Say if the husband is 25 years old. How old is the wife when I say: 1.) His wife is as old again as he.

She's twice his age. His age (25), and again his age (25 more.) So if he's 25, she's 50.
2.) His wife is twice/ two times as old again as he.

Same thing, she's twice his age (25x2).
The only difference is that in the first case, the listener is being told to add the two numbers together and inthe decond they're being told to multiply by two.
3.) if I want to sue " as old again as " structure to mean "She is twice as old ... older than he," then how should I use the "as old again as" to describe what I want to say?

"She's as old again as he is."
Thank you for whoese who is willing to help me. Casey The consfused learner.

It's a very informal usage, and one that English speakers tend to pick up by being around others who use it, not because it's taught.

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I disagree. Number 2 has "again" again, so her age would be three times his.
Bill
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Say if the husband is 25 years old. How old is the wife when I say: 1.) His wife is as old again as he.

She's twice his age. His age (25), and again his age (25 more.) So if he's 25, she's 50.

Yes.
2.) His wife is twice/ two times as old again as he.

Same thing, she's twice his age (25x2).

No, they're not the same. "His wife is {twice / two times} as old as he" would be equivalent to #1, but the "again" implies a further addition.
The only difference is that in the first case, the listener is being told to add the two numbers together and inthe decond they're being told to multiply by two.

That would describe my sentence above, but not Casey's #2. There, we are being told to multiply and add: twice 25 and another 25 (*** + 25) makes 75. To generalize, "twice as much again" is equivalent to "three times as much". From where I live it takes about an hour and a half to drive to Red Deer, and from there it's another three hours to Banff, so I might say "Banff is twice as far again as Red Deer."
3.) if I want to sue " as old again ... old again as" to describe what I want to say?

"She's as old again as he is."

I agree for the first two paraphrases, which clearly mean the same as #1 above, but "two times older" is ambiguous: many, if not most, will take it to mean the same as #2. It's often used for #1 in casual conversation, but strictly speaking the comparative "older", replacing "as old", implies the same further addition to the original quantity as that implied by the insertion of "again". The context will sometimes indicate which meaning is intended, but otherwise I'd recommend avoiding the combination of a comparatives with a ratio in this manner. (Of course there's no such problem with absolute quantities, as in "two years older": nobody will mistake that for "two years old".)

The "again" constructions should be used with caution, because they're easily misconstrued if the significance of the "again" is overlooked on my first reading I didn't see anything wrong with your reply concerning #2 myself. That said, "as much again" and "half as much again" are common enough that they're almost fixed idioms, and therefore rarely misunderstood; it's when larger ratios are concerned that confusion becomes most likely.
Las Vegas casinos take advantage of another detail that's easy to overlook, the difference between "to" and "for", to make the field bets at Craps tables seem more attractive than they really are. Wagers for which the true odds are five to one (often written 5:1), for example, where the probability of winning is one in six (1/6, or one out of six), are labelled "5 for 1", disguising a 16.7% house edge (much higher than on the basic pass-line wager, among others) from naive players; the actual payout would normally be described as "4 to 1".

Odysseus
The Concise Oxford English Dictionary. Same thing, she's twice his ... and inthe decond they're being told to multiply by two.

I disagree. Number 2 has "again" again, so her age would be three times his. Bill

Urk. Careful reading is a necessity. And I didn't read carefully enough...
You're right, if she's twice again his age, then she's his age, plus twice his age.
If I made five times again what you made, then I made six times as much.
And so on.

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That's precisely what I did when I answered. I missed the 'again' following 'two times'.
Las Vegas casinos take advantage of another detail that's easy to overlook, the difference between "to" and "for", to make ... the basic pass-line wager, among others) from naive players; the actual payout would normally be described as "4 to 1".

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