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I was watching a television special about life in the White House with my dad, and he pointed out two statements from Michelle Obama that contained poor grammar.

Both statements sounded correct to me, but he's a technical writer so I would tend to believe his opinion!

So I pose my question to you. Does Michelle Obama have poor grammar:

1. "He's two years older than me."
2. "I'm smarter than him."

Thanks!
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Hi,

I was watching a television special about life in the White House with my dad, and he pointed out two statements from Michelle Obama that contained poor grammar.

Both statements sounded correct to me, but he's a technical writer so I would tend to believe his opinion!

So I pose my question to you. Does Michelle Obama have poor grammar:

1. "He's two years older than me."

2. "I'm smarter than him."

In his very useful book, 'Practical English Usage', Michael Swan says this.

In an informal style, object pronouns are used after 'than'. In a more formal style, subject pronouns are used (usually with verbs).

She's older than me. (informal)

She's older than I (am) (formal)

Ask your Dad if he preferred George W. Bush's use of English. Emotion: zip itEmotion: crying

Best wishes, Clive
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AnonymousI was watching a television special about life in the White House with my dad, and he pointed out two statements from Michelle Obama that contained poor grammar.

Both statements sounded correct to me, but he's a technical writer so I would tend to believe his opinion!

So I post my question to you. Does Michelle Obama have poor grammar:

1. "He's two years older than me."

2. "I'm smarter than him."

Thanks!

They sounded fine with me!

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GoodmanSo I post my question to you. Does Michelle Obama have poor grammar:

1. "He's two years older than me."

2. "I'm smarter than him."

Why is 'pose' my question...' wrong?
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
"pose a question" - 277,000 hits

"post a question" 44,000,000 hits

Pose and post used with "question", do not mean exactly the same in my opinion.

The industrial waste and poor air quality pose a serious health risk for people living in the southern coastal provinces of China. (here POSE means "constitute")

The physical symptoms of alcohol withdrawal pose a serious health concern. A seemingly mild case of shaking, anxiety and headaches can turn into dangerous ...http://www.EnglishForward.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1G1GGLQ_ENUS337&ie=UTF-8&q=related:www.clearhavencenter.com/addictions-research/alcohol-addiction/alcohol-withdrawal/

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Hi Goodman,

'Pose a question' means ask a question, in the sense of 'put a question forward for consideration'.

'Post a question' is normally used in the context of placing a question online, eg in a Forum like this.

That's probably why there are so many online hits for 'post'.

In addition, 'pose a question' is more formal and thus less common than 'ask a question'.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive,

I understand your explanation. Thank you. I also said: "Pose and post used with "question", do not mean exactly the same in my opinion".

I guess it depends on how we apporach the question.

If I said "I posted this question twice on the forum..." would you say, "post" is better suited" than "pose"?
Hi,

'Posted it twice on the Forum' means placed it on the Forum twice.

'Posed it twice on the Forum' means asked it on the Forum twice.

I can also 'pose a question' if I am having a face to face conversation with you and my computer is turned off.

Best wishes, Clive
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Did your Dad give you the reasons why he thought those were examples of bad grammar, Anon?
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