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(1) I have been working at this company for ten years.
(2) I have been working for this company for ten years.

My non-native English speaking friends and I are sure "at/for" fit the sentence because you are talking about the company that employs you.

I have made up the example below.


(3) For my job, I have to meet with my clients and work on projects with them outside almost all day every day. I am a bit tired of doing that. However, I will get a promotion soon so that I can work in the company all the time.

All of my friends are non-native speakers. They think "work in" makes sense because you will not be working outside of your company.

Because they are non-native, I am not sure if they are correct. Is "work in" right in this context (3)? Please answer my question. Thank you very much for your time and help.

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ansonguyQuote (1) I have been working at this company for ten years.(2) I have been working for this company for ten years.

You can use either one.

ansonguyHowever, I will get a promotion soon so that I can work in the company all the time.

This sounds odd. I assume you mean that you will be working in the company's office instead of in different places. You could say "I will get a promotion soon, and I will be working in (or at) the office all the time".

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(1) I have been working at this company for ten years.
(2) I have been working for this company for ten years.

My non-native English speaking friends and I are sure "at/for" fit the sentence because you are talking about the company that employs you.

Yes. for is more natural in my experience.

I have made up the example below.


(3) For my job, I have to meet with my clients and work on projects with them outside almost all day every day. I am a bit tired of doing that. However, I will get a promotion soon so that I can work in the company all the time.

No, that's not correct. We typically say just 'in the office'. eg I will get a promotion soon so that I can work in the offfice all the time.

Clive