+0
One always gets bullied when one depends on others, doesn't one?

Is the above tag question acceptable?

Thank you very much for your reply.
1 2
Comments  
Teo
One always gets bullied when one depends on others, doesn't one?

Is the above tag question acceptable?

Thank you very much for your reply.

Depends on what you mean by 'acceptable'. The question makes sense, entirely, but it would probably be considered a pretentious use of language unless maybe a member of the Royal Family said it.
The question tag is grammatically correct, but it's true the language is a bit stilted!
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Alternatively:

People always get bullied when they depend on others, don't they?
Hi,

One always gets bullied when one depends on others, doesn't one?

I wouldn't call this stilted, I'd just say it's somewhat formal.

In my experience, this kind of use of the pronoun one is not characteristic of AmE. My understanding is that Americans tend to see this as a bit pretentious.

Perhaps someone in Britain could let us know if this is still common there.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive
Hi,

One always gets bullied when one depends on others, doesn't one?

I wouldn't call this stilted, I'd just say it's somewhat formal.

In my experience, this kind of use of the pronoun one is not characteristic of AmE. My understanding is that Americans tend to see this as a bit pretentious.

Perhaps someone in Britain could let us know if this is still common there.

Best wishes, Clive

Clive, I amBritish. Emotion: smile

Actually, you are absolutely right. We do use 'one' in this way, esp. if one is middle/upper class. We certainly use it in writing. It is specifically the question tag in bold that is bombastic, though. The sentence would sound quite normal here, otherwise.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi Jussive,

I'm British, too. I just don't live there.

Yes, the British class system has its subtleties that are impossible for foreigners to penetrate, doesn't it?

Best wishes again, Clive
CliveHi Jussive,

I'm British, too. I just don't live there.

Yes, the British class system has its subtleties that are impossible for foreigners to penetrate, doesn't it?

Best wishes again, Clive

Where were you born, Clive, and where do you live now?
Jussive
Clive
Hi,

One always gets bullied when one depends on others, doesn't one?

I wouldn't call this stilted, I'd just say it's somewhat formal.

In my experience, this kind of use of the pronoun one is not characteristic of AmE. My understanding is that Americans tend to see this as a bit pretentious.

Perhaps someone in Britain could let us know if this is still common there.

Best wishes, Clive

Clive, I amBritish. Emotion: smile

Actually, you are absolutely right. We do use 'one' in this way, esp. if one is middle/upper class. We certainly use it in writing. It is specifically the question tag in bold that is bombastic, though. The sentence would sound quite normal here, otherwise.

I just realised my use of 'one' could be taken to imply something about my own class. Emotion: embarrassed

I didn't mean that. I just wanted to use the indefinite pronoun 'one' in my response. Emotion: big smile
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more