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Which is idiomatic?
How do you say the question and answer naturally?

trying to say that the person is giving you advice and it might benefit you.

What does it cost to try.
It doesn't cost anything to try.
It doesn't cost a thing to put cream on after your shower.

What does it hurt to try.
It doesn't hurt to try.
It doesn't hurt to put some cream on after your shower.

There is no harm in trying.
There is no harm in putting cream on after a shower.

Thank you so much
Comments  
Use question marks after questions, not periods. Otherwise they are all okay.
HI, thank you
Could you please clarify this for me?
Are cost and jurt synonymous here because I couldn't find them in the dictionary. Becuase in french we would use cost, but I've never heard it.
and are the questions idiomatically stated? For some reason "What does it cost to try?" and "What does it hurt to try?" make me cringe.

for hurt

can you use "doesn't" or "wouldn't" and do you need a subject as in "it wouldn't hurt you to..."

What does it cost to try?
It doesn't cost anything to try.
It doesn't cost a thing to put cream on after your shower.

What does it hurt to try?
It doesn't hurt to try.
It doesn't hurt to put some cream on after your shower.

Thank you and have a nice day
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alc24Are cost and jurt synonymous here because I couldn't find them in the dictionary.
I suppose you could say they are roughly synonymous in this particular context but not in general.
See definition number 3 here: http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/hurt

See definition number 3 here as well: http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/cost

In both cases you are saying that the person doesn't have to give up anything to use cream.
alc24can you use "doesn't" or "wouldn't" and do you need a subject as in "it wouldn't hurt you to..."
Yes, however as you have demonstrated in your example sentences "you" is optional.
Thank you Malrey

I think I will go with "hurt" as even in your link I didn't see a sentence like this "It wouldn't cost (a thing) to try. ??

What about the question please

What does it hurt to try? Is this the way you'd say it as I can't seem to find it on google or anywhere?

Thank you so much
alc24What does it hurt to try? Is this the way you'd say it as I can't seem to find it on google or anywhere?
I can see myself saying that in the right context. It's something that's much more likely to be spoken than written, which may explain your Google results.
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Thank you MalRey,

Quick thing please

This is idiomatic
It wouldn't hurt to help me every now and then

This isn't though right? It's wrong to you?
It wouldn't cost a thing to help me...
It wouldn't cost anything to help me...

Could you tell me what you think, and if it is a 100 percent idimatic or if you know of a better phrase?

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1061394

It doesn't cost anything to try?????

Thank you MalRey