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Hi all,

I sometimes hear lines that begins with "don't you" but ends up without a question mark. Like, "don't you tell me what's funny."

So my question is, when can I use a sentence like this? and what's the difference between "don't tell me what's funny" and "don't you tell me what's funny"?

Thanks for your help,
M.
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mitsuwao23what's the difference between "don't tell me what's funny" and "don't you tell me what's funny"?
The second shows anger, or much more anger than the first. The second is somewhat threatening. ever is often added.

Don't you ever try something like that again, or I'll make you wish you had never been born!

CJ
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"don't you tell me what's funny."

That's an imperative sentence. The subject is "you," understood.

Turn the page. = You turn the page.

You may include the "you" for emphasis.

I guess it's really called "Imperative voice." (It's like a command.)
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Comments  
Thanks, very clear always.
M
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Hi Cj!
CalifJimDon't you ever try something like that again, or I'll make you wish you had never been born!
I like this!
"Make my day" Emotion: big smile
frostwhiteI like this!
Just be careful who you say it to. Emotion: smile

CJ