+0
I'd be happy if someone would answer my questions. Thanks in advance.

Are the following sentences the same in meaning? If not, what's the difference?

A: Don't be afraid of making mistakes when you speak English.

B: Don't be afraid of making mistakes when speaking English.

C: Don't be afraid of making mistakes in speaking English.
Comments  
Here is my try:

A and B mean the same thing. The only difference is that in B you shortened the sentence but when it comes to C I am sorry I can't tell the same thing. C doesn't sound correct to me. It would be better if you said:

C: Don't be afraid of making mistakes in speaking.
Don't be afraid of making mistakes in English while you are speaking.

Don't be afraid of making mistakes in speaking lessons in English.

Don't be afraid of making mistakes while you are speaking English.
Magic-dragonI'd be happy if someone would answer my questions. Thanks in advance.

Are the following sentences the same in meaning? If not, what's the difference?

A: Don't be afraid of making mistakes when you speak English.

B: Don't be afraid of making mistakes when speaking English.
These two are the same in most contexts.
Magic-dragonC: Don't be afraid of making mistakes in speaking English.

This one is not so good, because this structure could mean that speaking English is itself a mistake (like "make a mistake by speaking English").
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Yes, as Ti:t said, don't be afraid of speaking English sounds strange.Did you mean don't be afraid to speak English?
I do not sense the same thing about sentence #3. Could you give an example to help me sense it? Emotion: smile

Thanks !
In my opinion the sentence A is ok, the sentence B would be better if you had used while instead. In the last sentence I'd rarther write in spoken english.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
--- I'm an original poster, Magic dragon. I too think C is different from the other 2. I saw in a book (In this book I found many grammar mistakes) the description saying all 3 are the same. Of course I'm very doubtful about it, and wanted other people's opinions.

I think "in ---ing" is the same as "by ---ing" or means some kind of progress leading to a completion.
Am I right?
I think in the latter meaning, the following 2 samples can be written.

A: You should be careful in crossing the road.
B: I was very happy in writing the book.

I think these 2 are correct. Am I right?
But I think the following sentence (C) is awkward.
C: You should be careful in choosing friends.
Am I right?

One more thing I want to ask is if "in ---ing" can be replaced by using "as".
Are the following 2 sentences the same in meaning?

A: You should be careful in crossing the road.
D: You should be careful as you cross [are crossing] the road.


Hi Magic-dragon,

Here is my angle...

I personally think the infinitive form works better in the “afraid” context.

Consider this:

A- I am afraid to ask Mary out?

B- Don’t be! What is there to fear? The worst maybe a ‘”no”!

In dialog “A”, if the infinitive [to] form is replaced with “afraid of asking Mary out”, it just sounds rough to my ears. I think, In direct context “ I am afraid ….” Should be followed by “to”.



Therefore, for the posted question: Don't be afraid of making mistakes in speaking English.

I would suggest: “ Don’t be afraid to make any mistakes while learning to speak English, as I think the context becomes more effective.