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Hi,

Please have a look at this:

You will need to present facts and details of the company’s financial health under different scenarios of future demand and market conditions in a format people can comprehend. You will have to be honest and forthcoming about those scenarios. Don’t be tempted to sandbag. CFOs have a tendency not to trust line managers to do the right thing in all cases and therefore put some resources in reserve without telling anyone in case the company looks like it might come up short at the end of the quarter.



1. Does the bold part mean 'don't be tempted to eluding the reality'?

2. What does 'line managers' mean?

3. Does 'in case... of the quarter' mean 'until... of the quarter' or CFOs are not transparent because they think if they are, the company will look like it might come up short at the end of the quarter?

Many thanks,

Nessie.
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Comments  
  1.  yes
  2. Business Definition for: Line Manager
    an employee's immediate superior, who oversees and has responsibility for the employee's work. A line manager at the lowest level of a large organization is a supervisor, but a manager at any level with direct responsibility for employees' work can be described as a line manager.
  3. in case=if

Thank you very much, pkr.

Line manager:

What about 'line people'? - ''Such exercises provide an opportunity to educate line people on the financial consequences of their actions by using real numbers and cut through the confusion they have from what they read in the media

In case:

Sorry but I still don't think it means 'if' here +_+
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Hello
"Line Manager" is a kind of job title,like "c2 product line manager",and there is "c2 product line" ,and if you need educate/train people who work at this "c2 product line"

it's all about "c2 product line".of cource there are managers and people working in it.

in case,see this

17.in case, if it should happen that; if: In case I am late, don't wait to start dinner.
18.in case of, in the event of; if there should be: In case of an error in judgment, the group leader will be held responsible

dictionary.com

Best Regards
Hi Sunsail Emotion: smile

Thank you very much for your answer. So you mean line manager is the manager who manages a product line? and line people are the people who work in a product line?

As for in case, I myself also understand it as what you quoted, but then the sentence seems so... odd.Emotion: indifferent

P.S. Your avatar is very impressive [H]
Hi

this is very usual business language.In the meetings you can use this to tell people how you estimate risks and what kind of precautions you make,or to show them how cautious you are.
"reserve without telling anyone in case the company looks like it might come up short at the end of the quarter."

Best Regards
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Hi Nessie

Here is my input. The definitions I give are based on how the words are used in the context:

1. to sandbag: to conceal or misrepresent something

2. The context in which I have most often heard the term "line manager" is in production. Thus, for me this would frequently be a person who oversees the people who are actually building or assembling a company's product(s). However, I also think that different companies use this term somewhat differently. So, it may also be used more generally as a term for the person who oversees a particular line of products, for example. The term I have most often heard used for the person who oversees one particular product is "product manager".

3. in case = in the event that

4. In the context you provided, it's a bit difficult to know exactly what the writer means, but generally speaking, when the author mentions "come up short" what he means is that there is less of something than was expected at the end of the quarter. Maybe additional context would make that clearer. Whatever the case, the suggestion seems to be that CFOs are often tempted to "hide" some resources and if things look bad at the end of the quarter, they can then use the hidden resources to make things look better.
When you sandbag, you overstate a need.

You sandbag your budget by saying you need $1.2 million when you really only need $1 million (so that when they cut your budget by 10% you still have enough).

You sandbag when you say that it will take 480 labor hours to get something done when you think it will really only take 440, so that when it comes in a week early, you look good.
Thanks a lot, everybody Emotion: smile

Here is the further context (it's a part of the book):



SET THE TONE

First, you will need to exude the honest conviction that the company will come the storm successfully. You must earn the trust, confidence, and collaboration of not only your peers among the senior managers of the company but also their subordinates, who are on the firing line.

Second, you will need to present facts and details of the company’s financial health under different scenarios of future demand and market conditions in a format people can comprehend. You will have to be honest and forthcoming about those scenarios. Don’t be tempted to sandbag. CFOs have a tendency not to trust line managers to do the right thing in all cases and therefore put some resources in reserve without telling anyone in case the company looks like it might come up short at the end of the quarter. Lay it on the line with both a top-down and a bottom-up analysis and communicate so each manager understands what it means for him or her in regard to his or her job. Crisp, repetitous communication is imperative to drive home the point that cash is king….

Third,….

Fourth,…

=> What does “set the tone” mean?
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