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Scenario:

Yesterday: I'm talking to my pal about my fitness schedule. The fitness center guy didn't mail me any information.

Today: I'm there at the fitness center and they have figured out my schedule. My pal calls me and I say: "You know how I don't have my schedule? I had to go to that fitness center so early today to figure out my schedule."

I'm not sure if I should use 'don't' or 'didn't' ? I still don't have that schdule that they were supposed to mail to me. So are both of them fine?

1. You know how I don't have my schedule? I had to go to that fitness center so early today to figure out my schedule.

2. You know how I didn't have my schedule? I had to go to that fitness center so early today to figure out my schedule.

Thanks.
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Comments  
Hi,

Yesterday: I'm talking to my pal about my fitness schedule. The fitness center guy didn't mail me any information.

Today: I'm there at the fitness center and they have figured out my schedule. My pal calls me and I say: "You know how I don't have my schedule? I had to go to that fitness center so early today to figure out my schedule."

I'm not sure if I should use 'don't' or 'didn't' ? I still don't have that schdule that they were supposed to mail to me. So are both of them fine?

1. You know how I don't have my schedule? I had to come to this fitness center so early today to figure out my schedule. "don't" means you still didn't get the schedule

2. You know how I didn't have my schedule? I had to come to this fitness center so early today to figure out my schedule. "didn't" means you didn't have it in the past but now, at the time of speaking, you do have it.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive2. You know how I didn't have my schedule? I had to come to this fitness center so early today to figure out my schedule. "didn't" means you didn't have it in the past but now, at the time of speaking, you do have it.

Best wishes, Clive

There's nothing in this that means that this person is now in possession of the schedule. There could have been continued screw ups at the fitness center that precluded the speaker getting the schedule.

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Dear Jack112,

It is a riddle, no? Emotion: smile

You called your friend yesterday. You told him that you did not have your schedule.

You call your friend today. He still knows that you did not have your schedule yesterday. But he does not know that you «don't have your schedule» today.

Therefore you say number 2:

«You know how I didn't have my schedule? I had to go to that fitness center so early today to figure out my schedule.»

It does not matter if you have your schedule now or not. It is what your friend knows that matters. Emotion: smile

Kind regards,

Goldmund
Couldn't we replace "how" by "why"?
As in "You know why I didn't have my schedule?"???
No, I wouldn't make that substitution. It changes the meaning.
With "how", the implication is that the other person does know.
With "why" it becomes a true question asking "Do you know why I didn't have my schedule?"
The first asks the other person to recall something already known.
The second asks the other person to provide a reason or explanation.

CJ
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Then "how" as in "how come" ?

Thanks, CJ!
Pieanne,
No. I still think that "how" means something different from "how come" (the equivalent of "why") in that sentence.
Example: The sentence below doesn't ask for information about the methods of translation. It asks you to recall an incident or event. The intent is to elicit an affirmative - a recognition of the incident or event - with the further intent to speak at greater length on the subject once the questioner has oriented the listener to the topic at hand.

"Do you know how I translated some material from French a few months ago?"

So the "how" means neither "why" nor its equivalent "how come".
In fact, "Do you know how I ...?" means "Can you recall that I ...?" or simply, "Recall that I ...".

CJ
(I hope I interpreted your last post correctly in my response!)
Yes, perfectly!

I had never come across that expression, but now it makes perfect sense, thanks Emotion: smile . I guess we use about the same in French, only it's "You knowwhen I didn't find that letter? Well, I just found it in the the microwave!" Thanks again.
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