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1. Don't give up, which is so beautiful. Your choices are always revelatory.

2. Don't give up, which is what the enemy wants all of us to do.

(https://books.google.co.kr/books?id=axZrDwAAQBAJ&pg=PT147&dq="don%27t+give+up+which+is"&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjApq-E6p7qAhVTfd4KHQVZDrAQ6AEIKDAC#v=onepage&q="don't give up which is"&f=false )

I came across these two sentences by googling.

I have some questions of them.

Q1) In sentence 1, is "which" referring to "Don't give up"?

Q2) If Q1 is correct, is it grammatically possible to use "which" to refer to such a sentences as "don't give up"?

Q3) In sentence 2, I think that unlike in 1, "which" seems to refer to "give up", not "Don't give up", because if which refers to "Don't give up", sentence 2 doesn't make sense, because even the context I checked doesn't match the meaning of the sentence if "which" refers to "Don't give up".

So, I think in 2, "which" refers to "give up"

Q4) But if "which" refers to "give up", is it grammatically correct to use "which" to refer to a part of a sentence like in 2?

+1
fire11. Don't give up, which is so beautiful. Your choices are always revelatory.

This makes no sense to me. It's beautiful to give up???

fire1Q1) In sentence 1, is "which" referring to "Don't give up"?

Apparently.

fire1Q2) If Q1 is correct, is it grammatically possible to use "which" to refer to such a sentences as "don't give up"?

"which" can be used to refer to an imperative, but it makes no sense in example 1.

fire1Q3) In sentence 2, I think that unlike in 1, "which" seems to refer to "give up", not "Don't give up", because if which refers to "Don't give up", sentence 2 doesn't make sense, because even the context I checked doesn't match the meaning of the sentence if "which" refers to "Don't give up".So, I think in 2, "which" refers to "give up"

Correct.

fire1Q4) But if "which" refers to "give up", is it grammatically correct to use "which" to refer to a part of a sentence like in 2?

Yes. This grammatical pattern is rare, but it's possible.

CJ

Comments  
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CalifJim"which" can be used to refer to an imperative, but it makes no sense in example 1.

Doesn't "which" make sense if "which" refers to "Don't give up", not just "give up"?

I'm not sure whether I misunderstood your answer, but you said it's apparent that which refers "don't give up", but you said this makes no sesne to you "it's beautiful to give up". But isn't it "It's beautiful not to give up", since "which" refers to "don't give up"?, not just "give up"?

And what about in this passage.

- Don't too quickly make your mind up: You hate something, you love something else . Don't too quickly cut yourself off from possibilities of experience. Don't give up. Which is to say, don't be discouraged! Take all advice with the proverbial grain of salt ...

1. Is this part "Don't give up. Which is to say, don't be discouraged!" correct English? And does the part make sense?

2. What does "which" refer to? "Don't give up"? Or "give up"? I think which refers to "Don't give up" in this case.

Thank you very much.

CalifJimfire1Q2) If Q1 is correct, is it grammatically possible to use "which" to refer to such a sentences as "don't give up"?"which" can be used to refer to an imperative, but it makes no sense in example 1.

I came across the first sentence in a book.
But there is this mark (" ") as in "Don't give up", which is so beautiful. Your choices are always revelatory.
Maybe with the mark attached to "don't give up", does the first example make sense?

If it's wrong without the mark, is it always wrong to use which to refer to an imperative such as "don't verb", unless there is the mark attached to "don't verb"?

fire1Doesn't "which" make sense if "which" refers to "Don't give up", not just "give up"?

Not really.

fire1you said it's apparent that which refers "don't give up"

"apparently" means "it seems so". In other words, who knows what crazy thoughts were going through the writer's head when he chose those words?

fire1But isn't it "It's beautiful not to give up"

Maybe. I can't read the writer's mind, and for this example I don't think it's worth your trouble to try to do so, either.

fire11. Is this part "Don't give up. Which is to say, don't be discouraged!" correct English?

Yes. "Which is to say" means "In other words".

fire1And does the part make sense?

Yes. It makes sense to reword what you say in different words if you think that will help the reader to understand your meaning.

fire12. What does "which" refer to? "Don't give up"? Or "give up"? I think which refers to "Don't give up" in this case.

Right, because here one word group is simply redefining another word group. "Don't this" = "Don't that". Or "This = that".

CJ

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CalifJim

If "You don't give up" is written instead of "don't give up" in example 1, could 1 make sense?

Doesn't example 1 make sense even if "which" is used to refer to "don't give up", because "don't give up" is the speaker's interrogative sentence?

I don't think that example 1 makes sense even if which refers to "don't give up", because given that, example 1 sounds like the speaker's interrogative is so beautiful. But if we think of "don't give up" as a fragment of "You don't give up", I'd say example 1 makes sense, though it's not a good writing.

Then would the example below make sense?

- A. My mother used to say "don't give up", which encouraged me so much.

Here, I use "which" to refer to "don't give up".

I think sentence A does make sense unlike 1.

If "You don't give up" is written instead of "don't give up" in example 1, could 1 make sense?

You don't give up, which is beautiful.

Yes. That's better.

Doesn't example 1 make sense even if "which" is used to refer to "don't give up", because "don't give up" is the speaker's interrogative sentence?

Interrogative? "Don't give up" is not an interrogative. It's an imperative.

I don't think that example 1 makes sense even if which refers to "don't give up", because given that, example 1 sounds like the speaker's interrogative is so beautiful. But if we think of "don't give up" as a fragment of "You don't give up", I'd say example 1 makes sense, though it's not a good writing.

OK. That's a valid point.

Then would the example below make sense?

- A. My mother used to say "don't give up", which encouraged me so much.

Here, I use "which" to refer to "don't give up".

You can't make that decision. The reader will think that the fact that your mother said it is what encouraged you. 'which' refers to the whole preceding clause no matter what you think it refers to.

I think sentence A does make sense unlike 1.

Yes, it does.


Italics for a whole post? It looks awful. Please use italics only to highlight quoted examples. Thanks.

CJ