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This is the phrase I've found in a book written by a native speaker of English:

Hurry it up. We don't got all day.

About the part in red 'don't got', is it colloquially acceptable? Or is it simply a mistake?
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TakaThis is the phrase I've found in a book written by a native speaker of English:

Hurry it up. We don't got all day.

About the part in red 'don't got', is it colloquially acceptable? Or is it simply a mistake?
Definitely substandard for "don't have".
PhilipDefinitely substandard for "don't have".
When you say it's 'substandard', do you mean that it's grammatically wrong but still widely used in reality? Or do you mean that it's completely wrong and you rarely hear it in everyday life?
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Maybe for "don't have got"?

It's definitely ungrammatical, since "got" is not an infinitive. But I guess it must be heard quite often, although you'll need a native American speaker to tell you how much...
Personal opinion:

It's grammatically wrong but, in some places, is used enough that it is worth being aware of simply so you'll recognize it if you hear it. There are other places where it almost hurts people's ears because it sounds so wrong! Try to avoid using it yourself. "Don't have" is much better to use.
Taka
PhilipDefinitely substandard for "don't have".
When you say it's 'substandard', do you mean that it's grammatically wrong but still widely used in reality? Or do you mean that it's completely wrong and you rarely hear it in everyday life?
Hurry up! We ain’t got all day!

This is another one in the substandard category.
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Taka
PhilipDefinitely substandard for "don't have".
When you say it's 'substandard', do you mean that it's grammatically wrong but still widely used in reality? Or do you mean that it's completely wrong and you rarely hear it in everyday life?
It's "grammatically wrong" in that usage books and teachers will tell you not to use it. But it's completely acceptable in the speech communities where it is used. You can hear it in everyday life, yes.

I would say it is nonstandard - it's not standard English, but it is comprehensible.
This reminds me strangely of a not-so-old post on this forum... Emotion: thinking
In an ordinary urban setting among middle-class, fairly educated people you will almost never hear don't got. My impression is that it is exceedingly rare. But in rural areas or inner-city settings or among less well-off or less well-read people you will sometimes hear don't got.

I would not consider it colloquially acceptable (to the average American) in the way that so many slang expressions and abbreviated forms like gonna and wanna are.

CJ
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