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Don't look at me with such sad eyes. I do't feel that bad.

Does the above sound good and make sense to you? If not, how would you revise it? Thanks.
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Comments  
It sounds like you've said you're sick and the person looks more concerned than is warranted. Is that what you meant?

By the way, I assume "do't" is really "don't" right?
Grammar GeekIt sounds like you've said you're sick and the person looks more concerned than is warranted. Is that what you meant?

By the way, I assume "do't" is really "don't" right?

Thanks, GG.

I didn't write the base sentence, and yes, it's "don't."

Besides, I think your interpretation is quite close to the original, but does it sound natural to you? If not, how would you say it?
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I'd probably say "Don't look so concerned" or "Don't look so sad!"
Grammar GeekI'd probably say "Don't look so concerned" or "Don't look so sad!"
Thanks, GG.

To make sure, does the bolded part in your reply amount to "Don't look so worried?"
Yes, they are the same.

For the record, "sad eyes" is a nice literary way to say it. If you told me you were dying, I may look at you with sad eyes. If you said you had a bit of a cold, I would not.
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Hi,

I usually look at poor grammar with sad eyes. Emotion: sad

Clive
That with a lower case g, right?
Grammar GeekYes, they are the same.

For the record, "sad eyes" is a nice literary way to say it. If you told me you were dying, I may look at you with sad eyes. If you said you had a bit of a cold, I would not.

Thanks, GG.

Sorry to bother you again! What does "For the record" mean in your post?
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