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Hi people!

I'd like to know whether both these two expressions are correct and accepted: "X, please don't get offended / X, please don't be offended."

I want to use it in writing in the imperative form (but somewhat jokingly): "Hi guys! (Laura, please don't get / be offended, "guys" is used to address a group of people of either sex .)"

Is there any difference in meaning between the two > (be offended / get offended)?

Are there any situations in which one is preferred to the other?

Thanks a lot!

Mara.
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Hi Mara,

First, you get offended. It's like 'become offended'.

After that, you are offended. You are in an offended state.

Are there any situations in which one is preferred to the other?

As something you say to tell people that you don't want to offend them, either is fine and both are commonly said. The latter is a bit more formal, since 'get' is a word that tends to be associated with informal speech in various ways.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thanks Clive! So, in the context I want to use it (the sentence I wrote in my first post) both are possible, right?

Another question: some of the people who advised me against the use of "get offended" argued that "get" shouldn't be followed by a past participle. Now, is "offended" an adjective or a past participle? I know that past participles have adjectival function, but there are some which have come to be considered adjectives in their own right, such as "learned" in "a learned man". How can I realize up to what degree a past participle is a full adjective or is still a past participle with adjectival force?

Thanks a lot!

Mara.
Hello Mara,

Thanks Clive! So, in the context I want to use it (the sentence I wrote in my first post) both are possible, right? Yes.

Another question: some of the people who advised me against the use of "get offended" argued that "get" shouldn't be followed by a past participle. They don't think we should say things like '... get tired'? Why not?

Now, is "offended" an adjective or a past participle? I'm not good at namimg things in grammar, but to me it seems to function as an adjective here. It's like saying 'Don't get sleepy'. The verb 'get' here is used in the sense of 'become'.

I know that past participles have adjectival function, but there are some which have come to be considered adjectives in their own right, such as "learned" in "a learned man". How can I realize up to what degree a past participle is a full adjective or is still a past participle with adjectival force? I don't think I can answer this. My reaction to a question like this is to wonder why you need to know. I guess it would help you to understand the sentence better, but it seems to me that if you can pose such a question, you already have a pretty good understanding.

Best wishes, Clive