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Hey, dear teachers, I wrote the following sentences. Could you tell me if I can use period this way to end the sentences, as opposed to using question mark?

1. Aren't the residents up in arms over the prospect of a gas station to be built near their neighborhood.
(=The residents are up in arms over the prospect of a gas station to be built near their neighborhood)

2. Don't you think families are smaller than they were in those days.
(=You think families are smaller than they were in those days)

3. Can't the office workers do less overtime and dedicate their free time to their interests.
(=The office workers can do less overtime and dedicate their free time to their interests)

4. Wouldn't the president be impeached and suspended if the scandal was revealed.
(=The president would be impeached and suspended if the scandal was revealed)
Thank you in advance.
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Comments  
It is not impossible for a sentence that is grammatically a question to effectively be meant as a statement, and therefore not need a question mark. For example, "Aren't you the clever one", meant sarcastically, might be treated this way. However, none of your examples are obvious candidates for this. Normally they would take question marks.

Aren't the residents up in arms over the prospect of a gas station being built in their neighborhood?
Thank you for your explanation, Mr G. Can I ask a few more questions?
1. Do you mean only when we intend it as a sarcasm can we use a period to end a question?
2. What do "Aren't you the clever one" imply?
3. I make a few similar sentences, which are grammatically questions but end with periods. Could you check them?

Can't the dropout be a success in the future.(It means the speaker thinks though the student didn't finish his studies, he can be as successful as those graduates in the future)

Aren't the politicians hypocritical.(It means the speaker thinks the politicians are hypocritical)

Thank you again.
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zuotengdazuo1. Do you mean only when we intend it as a sarcasm can we use a period to end a question?
No, that was just one random example to show the possibility. "Isn't this lovely!" is another.
zuotengdazuo2. What do "Aren't you the clever one" imply?
You could say this (sarcastically) when someone is pleased with themselves because they have done something that they think is clever, but you don't think it is so clever.
zuotengdazuoCan't the dropout be a success in the future.(It means the speaker thinks though the student didn't finish his studies, he can be as successful as those graduates in the future)
This one doesn't really work.
zuotengdazuoAren't the politicians hypocritical.(It means the speaker thinks the politicians are hypocritical)
This one works better.

"the politicians" means some specific politicians. If you mean politicians in general, delete "the".
Thank you for your further explanation. So generally speaking, when do we use a period to end a question? Besides when we intend it as a sarcasm?
zuotengdazuoSo generally speaking, when do we use a period to end a question?
When it is grammatically in the form of a question but is not really intended as one, but only certain rather special cases work well. Unfortunately I can't give you any rules about how to identify these. It seems very much a case of "feel" for the language. Generally speaking, shorter more colloquial sentences probably have more chance of working than long formal sentences.
zuotengdazuoBesides when we intend it as a sarcasm?
Don't focus especially on sarcasm. That was just one random example. It was the first one that came into my head, that's all.
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GPY Don't focus especially on sarcasm. That was just one random example. It was the first one that came into my head, that's all.
Thank you again. I see.
1. I just thought beside sarcasm, this kind of sentence can intend otherwise?
For instance, you said "Isn't this lovely!" was another case. What does it imply?

2. Moreover, after examining your reply carefully, I come to wonder whether the sentence "Aren't the politicians are hypocritical." means "the politicians are hypocritical". Maybe it means "The politicians think they are hypocritical, but the speaker doesn't really think they are hypocritical"? Analogous to "Aren't you the clever one."?
zuotengdazuoFor instance, you said "Isn't this lovely!" was another case. What does it imply?
The speaker is saying that he or she thinks something is lovely. Of course, "Isn't this lovely!" can be used sarcastically, but this is true of very large numbers of statements (including e.g. "This is lovely!"), and has nothing specifically to do with your question.
zuotengdazuo2. Moreover, after examining your reply carefully, I come to wonder whether the sentence "Aren't the politicians are hypocritical." means "the politicians are hypocritical". Maybe it means "The politicians think they are hypocritical, but the speaker doesn't really think they are hypocritical"? Analogous to "Aren't you the clever one."?
That is a highly unlikely interpretation. For a start, almost no one thinks that they themselves are hypocritical.

Thank you so much. Now I know these sentences are rhetorical questions although they are punctuated with periods.
1. Can almost all the sentences like these be interpreted in two ways?
For example, "Aren't you the clever one." can mean "You are the clever one"(praise) or "You are not the clever one"(sarcasm)?
Which way we interpret it completely depends on the context?

2. Does whether a period or a question mark is used makes a difference to the meaning of the sentence?
For example, "Aren't you the clever one?" and "Aren't you the clever one." They differ in meaning?
I have seen example like "Won't I be glad to see the last of him." If it is punctuated with a question mark, its meaning changes.
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