"Don't you carry his name abroad"
Has anyone heard this phrase before? I'll put it in context:

"If you don't like your brother, don't you carry his name abraod, but take him in your bosom and carry him home to God"
Yes, you guessed it's part of the words to an old song. I'm just trying to get clear what the "carry his name abroad" means... In fact, you might even be kind enough to explain what the rest of the above lyric means too...
Thank you,
Allen
"Don't you carry his name abroad" Has anyone heard this phrase before? I'll put it in context: "If you don't ... means... In fact, you might even be kind enough to explain what the rest of the above lyric means too...

http://home.t-online.de/home/***/blessed.htm
I think it means "don't spread your bad thoughts about him/her in public.
Gary
Thanks Gary. That's what I guessed too, but just wanted a deeper explanation of the choice of words which seem unusual and sort of esoteric.
BTW, thanks for the link to the lyrics. That's the same version of the son I was listening to - by the wonderful MJH.
ALlen
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"Don't you carry his name abroad" Has anyone heard this ... explain what the rest of the above lyric means too...

http://home.t-online.de/home/***/blessed.htm I think it means "don't spread your bad thoughts about him/her in public.

It does, and parallels an old English adage that I learned when I was a kid - "If you can't say anything nice about someone, then say nothing".

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
It does, and parallels an old English adage that I learned when I was a kid - "If you can't say anything nice about someone, then say nothing".

There was a variant of that in a movie
My youngest son, three or four at the time,
turned it into advice for politicians:
"If you ain't got nothing to say, don't say nothing at all."

Come to think of it, that's good advice for Usenet. Please pretend I did not post. :-)

Wes Groleau
"Lewis's case for the existence of God is fallacious." "You mean like circular reasoning?"
"He believes in God. Therefore, he's fallacious."
It does, and parallels an old English adage that I ... you can't say anything nice about someone, then say nothing".

There was a variant of that in a movie My youngest son, three or four at the time, turned it ... nothing at all." Come to think of it, that's good advice for Usenet. Please pretend I did not post. :-)

Then there was:
"If you can't say something good about someone, sit right here by me." Alice Roosevelt Longworth
The invitation was supposedly embroidered on a cushion in her sitting-room.
Matti
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies