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Hi

Would you say that both of the following versions are acceptable in all versions of English? I'm aware that grammar books prefer the second one.

1- Don't you know who am I?

2- Don't you know who I am?

Thanks,

Tom
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Comments  
The first one while not wrong does sound odd. It makes it sound that the speaker doesn't know themselves.
Dave PhillipsThe first one while not wrong does sound odd.
Not wrong? In indirect questions the subject precedes the finite verb. Is this sentence also right in your opinion: Don't you know what did I do?

CB
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No it isn't right. That would be why it sounds odd. I haven't studied the graamar in great depth and therefore things sound wrong to me, but if I can't state why I believe them to be jusdt not the way be would say it. Thanks for your help CB.
But why are these correct?

She asked me who was the best player.

She wondered where was her seat.

I asked what was the matter.

Shall we discuss the topic a bit more?

Thanks,

Tom
Reminds me of the song...

Don't you know who I am

Remember my name

Fame

I wanna live forever

I want to learn how to fly HIGH...
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Mr. TomShe asked me who was the best player.

She wondered where was her seat.

I asked what was the matter.
All those wh- words work as a subject of a dependent clause, and therefore a linking verb can follow. That's what I've learned here!
Liveinjapan
Mr. TomShe asked me who the best player was.

She wondered where her seat was.

I asked [a pronoun] what the matter was.
LiveinjapanAll those wh- words work as a subject of a dependent clause, and therefore a linking verb can follow. That's what I've learned here!
I am afraid you need to review the grammar of the above sentences which I've revised.They were incorrect.

The pattern you referred to may be this:

They asked me when she is leaving for London? Not when was she leaving for ....

She wants to know what time it is? Not what time was it?
Mr. TomShe asked me who was the best player.

She wondered where was her seat.

I asked what was the matter.
To my mind the second sentence isn't correct since where can't be the subject of a clause whereas who and what can:

Who saw it? Who likes apples?

What happened? What causes problems like that?

Tell me who saw it. I'd like to know who likes apples.
Does anyone know what happened? Very few people know what causes problems like that.

So, sentences 1 and 3 are in keeping with the rule that states the subject precedes the verb in indirect questions. The second sentence should read: She wondered where her seat was.

But: Where is she?
I'd like to know where she is.

This post of mine sheds no new light on the "problem" as I already mentioned in my previous post that the subject precedes the verb in indirect questions.

CB
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