A job advert in this week's Economist for a chair at the Universiteit van Amsterdam ends with the mysterious sentence: "Acquisition will not be appreciated." What does this mean?

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
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A job advert in this week's Economist for a chair at the Universiteit van Amsterdam ends with the mysterious sentence: "Acquisition will not be appreciated." What does this mean?

I don't know.

Charles Riggs
My email address: chriggs/at/eircom/dot/net
A job advert in this week's Economist for a chair at the Universiteit van Amsterdam ends with the mysterious sentence: "Acquisition will not be appreciated." What does this mean?

It is a literal translation of the Dutch phrase:
"Aquisitie wordt niet op prijs gesteld".
What it means is the following:
there are employment agencies, head-hunters, etc
who are looking for jobs for their clients,
or who are employed by people to look for a job for them.

Responses to the ad by any of those wil be ignored, only personal replies by candidates for the job will be considered. Anyone stupid enough to have signed a contract with such an agency is out of luck: he will have to buy them off himself. The university will not pay their fee.
Best,
Jan
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
A job advert in this week's Economist for a chair ... sentence: "Acquisition will not be appreciated." What does this mean?

It is a literal translation of the Dutch phrase: "Aquisitie wordt niet op prijs gesteld". What it means is the ... agency is out of luck: he will have to buy them off himself. The university will not pay their fee.

Thank you.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
A job advert in this week's Economist for a chair at the Universiteit van Amsterdam ends with the mysterious sentence: "Acquisition will not be appreciated." What does this mean?

Greed will not be rewarded.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
A job advert in this week's Economist for a chair ... sentence: "Acquisition will not be appreciated." What does this mean?

I don't know.

There really is no need to tell us,
Jan
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
A job advert in this week's Economist for a chair ... sentence: "Acquisition will not be appreciated." What does this mean?

It is a literal translation of the Dutch phrase: "Aquisitie wordt niet op prijs gesteld".

The editor and translator Joy Burrough-Boenisch wrote a whole book about this sort of thing: "Righting English That's Gone Dutch". Delightful reading!
One of the points she makes is that it's not just the Dutch who have to be careful about Dutch creeping in when they are writing English native English speakers living in the Netherlands and Dutch-speaking Belgium also need to be on guard against "going Dutch" and doing things like saying "map" when they mean "file folder" or "controlled" when they mean "checked" or "inspected" or "monitored". Naturally when those native speakers are working as translators or editors, extra vigilance is called for...
What it means is the following: there are employment agencies, head-hunters, etc who are looking for jobs for their clients, ... agency is out of luck: he will have to buy them off himself. The university will not pay their fee.

"Principals only" would be the idiomatic English translation, I think.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
"Roland Hutchinson" (Email Removed) schrieb im Newsbeitrag
One of the points she makes is that it's not just the Dutch who have to be careful about Dutch ... or "inspected" or "monitored". Naturally when those native speakers are working as translators or editors, extra vigilance is called for...

I know I have to concentrate sometimes not to go German. There are some concepts that are important in German which you can't translate easily into English, such as the subtle (but important) difference between "Ort", "Gemeinde", "Markt" and "Stadt". A German-English dictionary won't help much, either.
But you do tend to pick up phrases and constructions from the foreign language. One of the hardest things to do when translating is to free your mind from (in my case) German phraseology and idiom and write proper English.
But you do tend to pick up phrases and constructions from the foreign language. One of the hardest things to do when translating is to free your mind from (in my case) German phraseology and idiom and write proper English.

The danger is particularly notorious with respect to translating between English & French, because of the long & complicated interaction between those languages. There are entire dictionaries of dangerous words (usually with "Faux Amis" in the title).
Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
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