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Hello,

I would like to know what "Double Dutch Darky" means. It comes from this lyric by TNT:

"double dutch darky

take kisses back to

they dipped you in a vat

at the wacky chocolate factory"

Thanks a lot.
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"Darky" is an old-fashioned term, now considered perjorative, for a black person.

"Dutch" in this case probably refers to a method of processing chocolate; recipes using chocolate are often called "double Dutch" to emphasize their chocolate deliciousness Emotion: smile

"Double Dutch" is also a children's jumprope game; the rhythm of these lyrics is reminiscent of the rhythm of some of the chants used in jumprope. According to Wikipedia, Double Dutch "became an element of hip-hop culture," so it's possible that the term here refers to both the game and the chocolate.

"Kisses" may be a play on the usual kind and also a well-known chocolate candy produced by Hershey called "kisses."

"Back to Africa" may possibly refer to a historical movement in the 19th century US to send American blacks, both free and slave, back to Africa. Considering the rest of the song, probably not; but it's interesting to read about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back-to-Africa_movement

I hope the vat at the wacky factory is self-explanatory.
Dear Delmobile,

Thanks a lot for your explanations. But I still have some problem to understand "double dutch darky". Does it mean "pure darky" or "completely darky"? I found out many references to "double dutch chocolate" on-line, but I couldn't find exactly what it means (although you said that it means a good thing), then I have assumed that double dutch chocolate might mean something like "pure chocolate". Is it right?

Also, I guess that "double dutch darky" is a kind of a racist assertion -- so I am not sure if "double dutch" in that case refers to a good thing like chocolate, but probably to the "purity" of darkness in "darky", just like the purity of chocolate in "double dutch chocolate". But again I am not sure if I am right. Could you help me please? (I have to translate "double-dutch darky" into Portuguese...)

Thanks a Lot, Laumont.
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"Dutch chocolate" is simply chocolate that has been processed in a particular way to improve its color and flavor. I don't think that "double Dutch" refers to a more elaborate processing method - I think that some cooks call their cakes, desserts, etc. "double Dutch" to make them sound more enticing.

"Double Dutch darky" could mean "pure darky," I suppose, but I think it's more likely to mean "chocolate darky." Say someone's girlfriend got a dark tan. He might say, "Wow, you're the color of cinnamon. Give me a kiss, you little cinnamon bun." That's how I see this, as almost affectionate.

These lyrics were taken from a poem by a black poet named Harryette Mullen, which puts a different slant on the idea that it is a racist assertion. The nearby verses (also heavy with wordplay) talk about skin creams. The poet seems to be criticizing the fact that skin care companies sell creams intended to lighten the skin of black women.

http://www.afropoets.net/harryettemullen4.html
I really don't think its meant to make any sense.
Well a quick look at the lyrics without looking in to the meaning of the words... my take is that the song is referring to "black people to return to Africa" or "black gangs to leave and go back to Africa" and also referring to them as crazy... I understand my opinion maybe incorrect... I would have to do some extensive research to have better understanding as to the meaning of the Double Dutch Darkies lyrics.
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Heya! They sampled this line from Harryette Mullens poem "Muse and Drudge". This is the link where she reads her poem, She sings the lines at 2:04
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Does anyone know if they sampled the lines from this reading specifically?
That is a slamming track! I think it is not “kisses” that is said, but “...take asses back to Africa...,” and I think it’s taken from an American black woman’s poem about prejudice she experienced. I really don’t think she or TnT are being pejorative, but rather attempting call attention to persistent American racism.