+0
Hi, I have a sentence with what I think is a double gerund: 'I stopped going shopping'. If that's a double, then what about this: 'I'm trying stopping going shopping' . Is that English? I do too much shopping. I've attempted to stop several times and I'm making another attempt at the moment.

regards

Chris
Comments  
'I'm trying stopping going shopping' is incorrect. 'try' is always followed by an infinitive, so 'tried to stop..., however, 'stopped going....' is IMHO correct...it can be also rephrased into 'stopped to go...' since 'go' can be followed by either gerund or infinitive..

I think you can compose a sentence which would contain numerous sequentially ordered gerunds by looking up the list of gerunds (if you don't remember them be heart) but there wouldn't be much use in it...Emotion: smile
Hi,

I guess you can make a lot of odd sentences, and it can be fun. I think the key is to think of the right context.

'try' is always followed by an infinitive

I've tried understanding why you say this. It's not a rule I've heard before. As you can see, I've tried making a sentence and it seems OK to me.

Best wishes, Clive
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hello Clive

I might say:
I tried to understand why you say this but I couldn't. It's not a rule I've heard before. As you can see, I've tried making a sentence and it seems OK to me.

My English Japanese dictionary says:
'Try to do' and 'try doing' are basically as below, though 'try doing' is often used the same way as 'try to do'.
*) tried to do : the action 'do' was not done
*) tried doing : the action 'do' was actually done.

paco
'stopped going....' is IMHO correct...it can be also rephrased into 'stopped to go...' since 'go' can be followed by either gerund or infinitive..

Do you mean "since 'stop' can can be followed by either gerund or infinitive? " THose are the two cases you have given as examples.

In any case, I would like to point out that (A)"I stopped going shopping" and (B) "I stopped to go shopping" have very different meanings. (A) means "I no longer go shopping." (B) means "I stopped (something else that I was doing) in order to go shopping" -- for instance, if you call home and say "I'll be a bit late -- I was on my way home, but I stopped to go shopping." (In which case your spouse might reply "I thought you had stopped stopping to go shopping," and you could reply to that, "I had started stopping shopping, but then I stopped stopping shopping.")
Khoff(In which case your spouse might reply "I thought you had stopped stopping to go shopping," and you could reply to that, "I had started stopping shopping, but then I stopped stopping shopping.")

Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Glad you liked it, MrP.