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Hello
What is the purpose of using two negatives in one sentence? I.e:

I don't tell you no lies

Is it only colloquial, acceptable usage? Or is it totally incorrect? I have seen much sentences like this one, but every reference book I have seen tells that it is incorrect to use double negatives.

Is it acceptable?
Why do people use these constructions?
Comments  
It is not acceptable in 'standard' English. Some people do use these constructions colloquially. It is, however, seen as rather 'uneducated'.
Thank you
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I reckon that that particular sentence would not be understood by most people. Does it mean that you do or you don't tell lies?
SpocikHello What is the purpose of using two negatives in one sentence? I.e: I don't tell you no lies Is it only colloquial, acceptable usage? Or is it totally incorrect? I have seen much sentences like this one, but every reference book I have seen tells that it is incorrect to use double negatives. Is it acceptable? Why do people use these constructions?
If they know correct English, people will use it for emphasis, but only in informal situations. One of my favorites, to mean "it doesn't make any difference to me" is "it don't make me no never-mind".
How about songs?

"Ain't no way we can lose..." Sure Shot, Tracy Weber
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"Ain't no" is very American. Again, it gives the impression of a poor education.
Ain't no sunshine when she's gone...

Ain't no mountain high enough...

In conversation, though, in the UK, it would be understood but not used very often other than in some strong London accents.