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1.women and girl students

2.woman and girl students

which of the sentence is correct?
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renjithvsathyan1.women and girl students 

2.woman and girl students

#1 is correct.
renjithvsathyan1.women and girl students

2.woman and girl students

which of the sentence is correct?


Hi,

Neither of them is a sentence. Besides, I'm not sure what you mean ... are both girls and women students or are there two groups in your phrase, girls (who are students) and women (who are not)?

If you are looking for a way of referring to both women and girls who study, than I'd say "female students". Or is it important to make some sort of distinction on the basis of the age?
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I think what Renjithvsathyan wants to know is whether girls who are students are called 'girl students' or 'girls students'. I think he is referring to the girls in primary schools.

On the other hand, there are women who attend a class for adults. He wants to know whether they are referred to as 'woman students' or 'women students'.
Hi,

Then I think you'd typically hear 'female primary students', 'female adult students'.

Clive
Hi

The following examples are from BNC. Maybe it is BrE.

H7E 1032 Much of the routine work was done by girl students eager to earn a little extra towards their fees.

A1A 855 At the same time, I have noticed that women academics can be ruthless bullies of girl students, with the possibly laudable motive of giving them the equivalent of a good shake.

A15 734 He liked young women students, and they responded with delight to him.

AL8 113 She also regularly accompanied groups of her women students to the Cambridge Summer School.
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If the question is only whether you should say "woman students" or "women students", then I would agree that "women students" would be the one to use.

I don't think this is a question of BE vs AmE.
Hi,

You'll certianly find examples of it being said in a variety of ways.

At the same time, I have noticed that women academics can be ruthless bullies of girl students, with the possibly laudable motive of giving them the equivalent of a good shake.

With regard to this one, I want to add a comment. The term 'academic' suggest this deals with the University level. If so, feminists would typically object to the term 'girl students' being used for adult women, particularly when the term 'girl academics' is not used.

For this reason, many people avoid the use of 'girl' in such a context. Male bosses, for example, can get into trouble if they refer to their female adult employees as 'girls'.

Perhaps this is not a consideration in some other cultures.

Best wishes, Clive