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hi all, Please tell me the usage of "going to". Because i used to to speak with this wordings for example 1) I am going to do this work 2) I am going to walk. I think in this sentences no mistake is there. But I want to know that these following senteces are correct or not ?. 1) I am going to go 2) I am going to come ? and I was going to come ? Pleas tell and correct me.

thanks and regards
tino
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Hi,

Please tell me the usage of "going to". Because i used to to speak with this wordings for example 1) I am going to do this work 2) I am going to walk. I think in this sentences no mistake is there. But I want to know that these following senteces are correct or not ?. 1) I am going to go 2) I am going to come ? and I was going to come ? Pleas tell and correct me.

Broadly speaking, 'going to + infinitive verb' expresses a planned intention.

Your sentences are all fine.

Clive
Dear clive,
thank you very much for your reply

regards
tino
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Hi Clive,

I'd just like to ask about the difference in meaning of certain words/phrases. If you could advise, please. Thank you.
CliveBroadly speaking, 'going to + infinitive verb' expresses a planned intention.
1. Since 'going to' expresses a planned intention and the present continuous expresses a settled plan, what is actually the difference between 'planned intention' and 'settled plan'?

I am going to go to the beach. (planned intention)

I am going to the beach. (settled plan)

2. What is the difference between 'plan' and 'intention'?
3. Does 'arrangement' have a different meaning from 'settled plan'?
I am going to go to the beach.
I am going to the beach.

One of the differences is that the present continuous indicates an arrangement for the near future.
Hi,

1. Since 'going to' expresses a planned intention and the present continuous expresses a settled plan, what is actually the difference between 'planned intention' and 'settled plan'?

I am going to go to the beach. (planned intention)

I am going to the beach. (settled plan) This is often used when complete or at least preliminary arrangements have been made.
eg I am going to the beach. I have bought a new swimsuit.

It often refers to the near future, although the definition of 'near future' is a bit elastic.

eg I am going to China in the summer of 2011. I have bought my plane ticket and booked a hotel in Beijing.

2. What is the difference between 'plan' and 'intention'?

3. Does 'arrangement' have a different meaning from 'settled plan'?

There's not a lot of difference between all these terms you are asking about. I think that, instead of trying to get abstract and precise definitions, the best thing for you to do is to study a lot of examples where native speakers actually speak about the future.

In conclusion, please also consider this. Even for native speakers, it's not always clear which form we should use in speaking, and we don't spend a lot of time thinking about it before we speak. In other words, it's not a precise matter.

Clive
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Thank you, MM and Clive, for your helpful responses.
CliveIn conclusion, please also consider this. Even for native speakers, it's not always clear which form we should use in speaking, and we don't spend a lot of time thinking about it before we speak. In other words, it's not a precise matter.
Point taken. I guess I was just overanalyzing this.

1. Looking at the examples on the internet, I found 'going to' more common than the present continuous when talking about the future. I think a native speaker uses 'going to' more often unless the situation or context shows its an arrangement. Please feel free to comment.

2. Incidentally, I found the excerpt below on the web. Would you agree?
3. To me, in the second sentence, 'made plans' sounds like an already settled plan making it the same in meaning as an arrangement. Do you think so?

Arrangement, plan, and intention go in decreasing order of how much work has been done.

"I have made arrangements to visit Paris." <- I have a hotel room reserved, and have requested time off from work.

"I have made plans to visit Paris." <- I've decided when I want to go, and have thought about what I want to see in the city.
"I intend to visit Paris." <- I want to go there at some point in the future.
Hi,

Point taken. I guess I was just overanalyzing this.

1. Looking at the examples on the internet, I found 'going to' more common than the present continuous when talking about the future. I think a native speaker uses 'going to' more often unless the situation or context shows its an arrangement. Please feel free to comment. Very true.

2. Incidentally, I found the excerpt below on the web. Would you agree? Yes, broadly speaking.

3. To me, in the second sentence, 'made plans' sounds like an already settled plan making it the same in meaning as an arrangement. Do you think so? You're over-analysing again.Emotion: smile

Arrangement, plan, and intention go in decreasing order of how much work has been done.

"I have made arrangements to visit Paris." <- I have a hotel room reserved, and have requested time off from work.

"I have made plans to visit Paris." <- I've decided when I want to go, and have thought about what I want to see in the city.
"I intend to visit Paris." <- I want to go there at some point in the future.


Clive





Hi Clive,

Thank you for responding to my questions and your confirmation.
CliveYou're over-analysing again. Emotion: smile
Oops! Sometimes I just can't help myself to over-analyse things. I'd better control myself, then. Emotion: smile

Anyway, thank you, again.
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