Dear all,
In English, what verb do people use for a boat? Do people say " drive a boat"?
In addition, in English, people say getting on a bus and getting off a bus. Do people say getting on a boat and getting off a boat, too? Thanks for your reply.
Linda
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In English, what verb do people use for a boat? Do people say " drive a boat"?

The row rowboats and sail sailboats and perhaps they "operate" bigger boats (anything under 200 feet long is a boat, but anything over that is a ship, at least in the US Navy).
In addition, in English, people say getting on a bus and getting off a bus. Do people say getting on a boat and getting off a boat, too? Thanks for your reply.

Again, it depends on the type and size of boat. You can't "get on" a rowboat unless it's upside down; you usually "get in". Other, bigger boats and ships, however, people "board".

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
Native speaker of American English; posting from Taiwan. Unmunged email: /at/easypeasy.com
"Impatience is the mother of misery."
Dear all, In English, what verb do people use for a boat? Do people say " drive a boat"? In ... a bus. Do people say getting on a boat and getting off a boat, too? Thanks for your reply. Linda

A boat is piloted.
Passengers board a boat or "go aboard".
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In English, what verb do people use for a boat? ... getting on a boat and getting off a boat, too?

A boat is piloted.

Not all boats are piloted. Only some are. Tugboats and ferries, for instance.
Passengers board a boat or "go aboard".

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
Native speaker of American English; posting from Taiwan. Unmunged email: /at/easypeasy.com
"Impatience is the mother of misery."
lu (Email Removed) had it:
Dear all, In English, what verb do people use for a boat? Do people say " drive a boat"?

My boat has no motor, so I sail it. I drive the safety boat when it's my turn.
In addition, in English, people say getting on a bus and getting off a bus. Do people say getting on a boat and getting off a boat, too?

Depends on the nature of the boat. You get "into" some boats, and on others.

David
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In English, what verb do people use for a boat? ... getting on a boat and getting off a boat, too?

A boat is piloted.

Here we go again!
Passengers board a boat or "go aboard".

People also get on ferries and later get off them.

A. Gwilliam
To e-mail me, replace "bottomless pit" with "devnull"
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UC (Email Removed) had it:
Dear all, In English, what verb do people use for ... getting off a boat, too? Thanks for your reply. Linda

A boat is piloted. Passengers board a boat or "go aboard".

That would sound extremely pretentious if used in relation to my 12 foot dinghy.

David
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Dear all, In English, what verb do people use for a boat? Do people say " drive a boat"?

"steer" or "sail"
In addition, in English, people say getting on a bus and getting off a bus. Do people say getting on a boat and getting off a boat, too?

Yes, though there are plenty of other expressions.

Adrian
In English, what verb do people use for a boat? Do people say " drive a boat"?

For Englishmen, it depends on the type of boat. You row a rowing boat, sail a sailing vessel, motor in a motorboat etc. Some other words differentiate between yourself managing the boat or just sitting still as a passenger.
In addition, in English, people say getting on a bus and getting off a bus. Do people say getting on a boat and getting off a boat, too?

Yes, nowadays we usually get on or off a boat unless it is a very small one (capacity 20 people or fewer) in which case you get into the boat and later get out of it. Traditionally for ships, get on = embark: so that later coinages included debark, with the prefix for the opposite function, and by analogy embus and debus (for getting on and off a bus: this was 50 years ago standard military nomenclature.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
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