+0
As anyone who has ever been in a verbal disagreement can attest, people tend to give elaborate justifications for their decisions, which we have every reason to believe are nothing more than rationalisations after the event. To prove such people wrong, though, or even provide enough evidence to change their mind, is an entirely different matter: who are you to say what my reasons are?
But with choice blindness we drive a large wedge between intentions and actions in the mind. As our participants give us verbal explanations about choices they never made, we can show them beyond doubt - and prove it - that what they say cannot be true.

What does the part in bold mean?
1 2
Comments  
Consider two things which would normally be together in some sense, perhaps touching, perhaps communicating remotely as a single unit.

Originally, a wedge was a tapered tool, usually metal, sharp on one end, used for splitting logs or firewood. One would drive it into the wood with a heavy sledge hammer until the wood was forced to separate into two parts.

Normally, intentions translate into actions. They communicate. By figuratively driving in this wedge, we keep them apart, so the normal function is prevented.
I somehow understand what 'to drive a wedge' means; it's 'to keep things apart' as you say.

But what does 'to drive a wedge between intentions in mind and actions in mind (not jut 'actions'; it's 'actions in mind') exactly mean? How does it related to the rest of the text?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
There are so many concepts of mind floating around these days I'd probably have to read your book to see exactly what they mean here.

Your entire nervous system is made up of neurons, or nerve cells.
Anything from memory on through to motor neurons (which activate your muscles) is made of the same stuff.

It comes down to what you mean by "intention." Does "intention" have a physical component? When you say "in your mind," do you mean "in your brain"?

Your eyes, ears, and nose are made up of nerve cells. They send a message along sensory nerve pathways to your brain, which somehow processes them as "wild tiger," and comes up with the INTENTION to run. Impulses are now sent in the other direction along motor nerve pathways to the muscles, to produce the ACTION. How does the wedge interrupt this process?
Are you looking at it as a psychologist or as a neurobiologist, or what the heck? They all speak different languages.

Have you read yet about the concept of "choice blindness"? I suspect you need to understand that to understand the wedge.
AvangiHave you read yet about the concept of "choice blindness"? I suspect you need to understand that to understand the wedge.
I've just read about it.
AvangiThey send a message along sensory nerve pathways to your brain, which somehow processes them as "wild tiger," and comes up with the INTENTION to run. Impulses are now sent in the other direction along motor nerve pathways to the muscles, to produce the ACTION.
I would take it that way if the original were:

we drive a large wedge between intentions in mind and actions they actually make.

but it's 'actions in mind'. What is 'actions in mind'?
we drive a large wedge between intentions and actions in the mind.

I guess your original question continues to go unanswered.
Perhaps we have a parsing problem here.
In my opinion, "in the mind" is adverbial, and you're taking it as adjectival.
I believe it modifies "drive," and you believe it modifies "actions."
You seem to take "actions in the mind" as a phrase, and you ask, "Where are they?"

Forget about "in the mind" for the moment.

We drive a large wedge between intentions and actions.

You know what "intentions" are and you know what "actions" are. You know these things without worrying about where they're located (I think).

You also know that there's a relationship between intentions and actions.
(Of course, some actions are involuntary, and don't involve intentions.)

We generally understand that intentions precede voluntary actions.
We want to somehow cut the cord between the two, but where do we find it?

I dunno - but I think it must be somewhere in the mind.
Where the heck is that??
I dunno - but that's where we're gonna drive the wedge - in the mind!

I could go back and repeat myself, saying that it's all acomplished by nerve cells in the brain, but I'm not sure it's going to help at this point.

Best wishes, - A.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
AH! I see. 'In the mind' was adverbial.

Then 'in the mind doesn't really seem necessary, don't you think so? This version, without 'in the mind', itself seems to make enough sense.

We drive a large wedge between intentions and actions.
Yes. I think we're on the same page. Emotion: smile

If you wish to refine (or define in great detail) exactly how this is accomplished, you would probably need to make clear which of the several scientific disciplines you're using.
AvangiYes. I think we're on the same page.
Good.
Avangi If you wish to refine (or define in great detail) exactly how this is accomplished, you would probably need to make clear which of the several scientific disciplines you're using.
To define what 'the mind' in 'in the mind' really means? Is that what you mean, Avangi?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more