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Context:

John, a store owner, requests a credit from his Head Office for stock they sent to his store without his authority.
Thinking John did in fact give authority, Head Office emails the following reponse:

Sentence in question:

a. Regarding your credit request for invoice #812035 due to stock being sent without authority, I have outlined below the orders placed by Support Office, along with...

Question:

Does it sound as though Head Office is conceding that stock was sent without authority? Should it be worded more carefully?

Appreciate your thoughts
Comments  
Hi,

Where is the Support Office/?
In Head Office?
In John's store?
Somewhere else?

Clive
Sorry, I'm used to using Support Office and Head Office interchangeably. In the sentence in question, 'Support Office' means Head Office.
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Hi,

John, a store owner, requests a credit from his Head Office for stock they sent to his store without his authority.
Thinking John did in fact give authority, Head Office emails the following reponse:

Sentence in question:

a. Regarding your credit request for invoice #812035 due to stock being sent without authority, I have outlined below the orders placed by Support Office, along with...

Question:

Does it sound as though Head Office is conceding that stock was sent without authority? Should it be worded more carefully? It speaks of orders placed by Support Office (ie Head Office). It says nothing to suggest John placed any orders.

Clive
Hi Clive,

I'm unsure if I've misunderstood you or vice versa.

I'm asking if the the guy-let's call him Mike-at Head Office needs to word the sentence differently, to avoid sounding as though he did in fact send stock without authority. That is, does Mike need to say something along the lines of this insetad:

"Regarding your credit request for invoice #812035 with the reason given that stock was sent without authority..."

OR

'Regarding your credit request for invoice #812035 due to stock apparently being sent without authority..." (I'd obviously avoid the word apparently, but I think I get my point across)

Thanks
Hi,

'm asking if the the guy-let's call him Mike-at Head Office needs to word the sentence differently, to avoid sounding as though he did in fact send stock without authority. That is, does Mike need to say something along the lines of this insetad:

"Regarding your credit request for invoice #812035 with the reason given that stock was sent without authority..."

Yes, that's good.
But why go on to outline the orders placed by the Support Office? What's that supposed to prove?

Clive
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Thanks. Because the sentence starts with 'regarding' I thought it may be more accurate to say exactly what this letter is in response to--that is, it's not in response to stock sent with authority, but rather without.

You would still word it as I have done: 'with the reason given'?

And outlining the orders placed by Support Office is slightly irrelevant, but I then go onto say that I also outline orders sent by the store.
Hi,

I would just say 'because . . . ', and then go on to say why that is not correct.

eg "Regarding your credit request for invoice #812035 because stock was sent without authority, we were in fact authorized by..."

Clive
OK, so

'Due to stock being sent without authority' trumps 'with the reason given that stock was sent without authority'

And 'because stock was sent without authority' trumps 'due to'

I can live with that. Thanks a lot.
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