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Is the following sentence correct?

English has been transplanted as a second language due to historical reasons.

From what I know, 'due to' cannnot be used together with 'reasons'.

If it is wrong, how should it be rephrased?
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Comments  
Seems OK to me. Cause/reason are interchangeable here.
Marius HancuSeems OK to me. Cause/reason are interchangeable here.
English has been transplanted as a second language due to historical reasons.

Wouldn't it be better if it is rephrased as follows?

English has been transplanted as a second language for historical reasons.
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Wouldn't it be better if it is rephrased as follows?

English has been transplanted as a second language for historical reasons.

No.
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due to

Function: preposition

: because of<the number and influence of investors are increasing, due to several causes -- Magazine of Wall Street> <when German power was at its peak, due to the unpreparedness of her neighbors -- Joseph Rosenfarb> <the event was canceled due to inclement weather> -- compare 1DUE 5


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Yoong LiatIs the following sentence correct?

From what I know, 'due to' cannnot be used together with 'reasons'.

If it is wrong, how should it be rephrased?



English has been transplanted as a second language due to historical reasons.

First, I am not exactly sure of the meaning of this sentence.

Secondly, It's perfectly ok to use "due to" with "reasons".

i.e. Due to other unexplained reasons other than fire damamge, the produciton floor will be kept shut-down for further investigation.

It should be clearer if the sentence is changed to:

English has been adopted as a second language partly due to historical reasons.

What about this sentence?

The reason he is fat is because is never exercises.

Can 'reason' be used together with 'because'?
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Yoong LiatIt should be clearer if the sentence is changed to:

English has been adopted as a second language partly due to historical reasons.

What about this sentence?

The reason he is fat is because is never exercises.

Can 'reason' be used together with 'because'?
English has been adopted as a second language partly due to historical reasons.

The blue part is making better sense with "adapted". Still the pink part puzzles me...

What about this sentence?

The reason he is fat is because is never exercises. This sentence is still an incorrect .

He is fat – why? The reason is, he never exercises. So the sentence should be:

1)” The reason why he is fat is because he never exercises”

Can 'reason' be used together with 'because'? -Yes

The reason (that) he is fat is because he never exercises.
This usage of reason is because is common, but considered inelegant and non-standard.
Because is redundant in the sentence.
I would say:

The reason for his being fat is that he never exercises.
The reason why he is fat is that he never exercises.
the reason (that) he is fat is that he never exercises.
InchoateknowledgeThe reason (that) he is fat is because he never exercises.
This usage of reason is because is common, but considered inelegant and non-standard.
Because is redundant in the sentence.
I would say:

The reason for his being fat is that he never exercises.
The reason why he is fat is that he never exercises.
the reason (that) he is fat is that he never exercises.
I agree with Incho. The sentence could also be rephrased as follows:

He is fat because he never exercises.
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