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The second site makes a serious error. "mannequin" does not ... diminutives ending on 'ken', while Flemish has lots of them.

Dutch and Flemish are the same language.

That is not entirely true. The "Nederlandse Taalunie" (Dutch language union) makes a distinction between written and spoken language. It states that the written language is more or less the same in the Netherlands and Flanders (even though there are frequent differences in vocabulary and syntax).
However, as for spoken language the Taalunie states there is no single Dutch language. Instead, there are three substandards: * Dutch: standard spoken in the Netherlands
* Flemish: standard spoken in Flanders
* Surinam Dutch: standard spoken in Suriname
I could go on giving you arguments, but I'll stick to this for now.

- Herman -
The second site makes a serious error. "mannequin" does not ... diminutives ending on 'ken', while Flemish has lots of them.

When I lived in Dutch Brabant it was quite normal to form dimunitives with -ke rather than -tje.

That is true. Some examples (Flemish versus Dutch):

meiske vs meisje (girl)
vrouwke vs vrouwtje (little woman
poeske vs poesje (kitten)
and many many more...
- Herman -
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The second site makes a serious error. "mannequin" does not ... diminutives ending on 'ken', while Flemish has lots of them.

When I lived in Dutch Brabant it was quite normal to form dimunitives with -ke rather than -tje.

That's correct The Brabant and Limburg dialects ( both southern Holland, so close to Flanders) generally use the diminutive -ke: manneke (little man) - meiske (little girl) - stukske (little piece), etc.
Dutch and Flemish are the same language.

That is not entirely true. The "Nederlandse Taalunie" (Dutch language union) makes a distinction between written and spoken language. It ... * Dutch: standard spoken in the Netherlands * Flemish: standard spoken in Flanders * Surinam Dutch: standard spoken in Suriname

What about the flavour(s) spoken in Indonesia, not that they speak much Dutch there these days - too many colonial hang-ups - or in the Antilles?
Dutch and Flemish are the same language.

That is not entirely true. The "Nederlandse Taalunie" (Dutch language union) makes a distinction between written and spoken language. It ... * Dutch: standard spoken in the Netherlands * Flemish: standard spoken in Flanders * Surinam Dutch: standard spoken in Suriname

Accepted. Although one could same the same with regard to Cockney and Georgie.
Axel
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That is not entirely true. The "Nederlandse Taalunie" (Dutch language ... spoken in Flanders * Surinam Dutch: standard spoken in Suriname

Accepted. Although one could same the same with regard to Cockney and Georgie.

It's usually at this point that I remind everyone of the dictum of the linguist Max Weinreich: "A language is a dialect with an army and a navy." And wonder why he didn't mention the air force :-)
John Briggs
Accepted. Although one could same the same with regard to Cockney and Georgie.

It's usually at this point that I remind everyone of the dictum of the linguist Max Weinreich: "A language is a dialect with an army and a navy." And wonder why he didn't mention the air force :-)

Very true. I did seem to find that my Dutch in Cologne was often more understood than my poor attempts at German since the latter has always been a language I read rather than speak.

Axel
On Wednesday, in article

It's usually at this point that I remind everyone of the dictum of the linguist Max Weinreich: "A language is a dialect with an army and a navy." And wonder why he didn't mention the air force :-)

1) When he wrote this, Air Forces were only a couple of decades old
2) Many countries did not have a separate Air Force (cf. Royal Air Force)but instead had air corps within their pre-existing armies and navies (eg USAAF).

Brian {Hamilton Kelly} (Email Removed) "Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu le loisir de la faire plus courte."
Blaise Pascal, /Lettres Provinciales/, 1657
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It's usually at this point that I remind everyone of ... And wonder why he didn't mention the air force :-)

1) When he wrote this, Air Forces were only a couple of decades old 2) Many countries did not have a separate Air Force (cf. Royal Air Force) but instead had air corps within their pre-existing armies and navies (eg USAAF).

The RAF was 27 years old (although it had its origins in the Royal Flying Corps of 1912) in 1945, and the USAF was to have a separate existence two years later. Air Power had been awfully significant during WW2 - you would have thought that he would have noticed.

John Briggs
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