I have another question, but I'm not sure whether this is the right group to ask it. If it isn't , please tell me.
Here is my question:
There are not so many words of Dutch origin in the English language. Some, I believe, are:
polder - *** (dike ?) - Santa Claus (in American English) = from Dutch 'Sinterklaas' , but I am not sure about the last one. Is there anyone who knows others?
Thank you!
Arthur
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I have another question, but I'm not sure whether this is the right group to ask it. If it isn't ... = from Dutch 'Sinterklaas' , but I am not sure about the last one. Is there anyone who knows others?

Try this. There are lots
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Dutch derivations

and this
http://www.krysstal.com/borrow dutch.html
I have another question, but I'm not sure whether this is the right group to ask it. If it isn't ... = from Dutch 'Sinterklaas' , but I am not sure about the last one. Is there anyone who knows others?

Many naval terms I believe... the only one I know off hand is:

yacht
Some military ones such as
forlorn hope (from verloren hoop)
without even develing into the many ones brought into the English language from Dutch/Afrikaana in Southern Africa.
Axel
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
without even develing into the many ones brought into the English language from Dutch/Afrikaana in Southern Africa.

opps... must have been typing away somewhat hastily

Axel
I have another question, but I'm not sure whether this ... about the last one. Is there anyone who knows others?

Try this. There are lots http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Dutch derivations and this http://www.krysstal.com/borrow dutch.html

Thanks alot, John!!!
Unbelievable!
Arthur
I have another question, but I'm not sure whether this ... about the last one. Is there anyone who knows others?

Many naval terms I believe... the only one I know off hand is: yacht Some military ones such as forlorn hope (from verloren hoop) without even develing into the many ones brought into the English language from Dutch/Afrikaana in Southern Africa. Axel

Thank you Axel. Have a look at the response of the next message, please!

Arthur
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I have another question, but I'm not sure whether this is the right group to ask it. If it isn't ... = from Dutch 'Sinterklaas' , but I am not sure about the last one. Is there anyone who knows others?

Dike/*** is related to OE "ditch" and evidently came with the Danes. I don't know how old the pronunciation is in terms such as "Offa's " or "Wansdyke" (in areas well away from Viking settlement) but I wonder if they suggest that it's even older. No doubt OED has more on the subject. "" is the standard term for a ditch or bank in my region (E. England). There's a village called which stands by the old Roman(?) "Car ". There are many Danish place name elements locally.
AFAIK, "Polder" isn't really naturalised into English as such. We only use it as the name of the reclaimed land in the Netherlands. We describe the equivalent as "fens" (or The Fens) in eastern England - whether drained or not. I believe there's a similar element (ven?) in some Dutch place names. There are also the Somerset Levels and Romney Marsh in other parts of the country - and perhaps other local names for marshy or reclaimed land.
The Holland area of Lincolnshire has a lot of fens and has had a lot of Dutch influence but the name is ancient and arose independently, meaning low-lying land.
Some say the word "***" came from Dutch seamen (careful how you say that) in the C16th but it doesn't seem to be confirmed.
Phil C.
Quite a lot of Dutch words come from beggars slang, called dog Latin, such as booze for example.
On Saturday, in article

I have another question, but I'm not sure whether this is the right group to ask it. If it isn't ... = from Dutch 'Sinterklaas' , but I am not sure about the last one. Is there anyone who knows others?

Poppycock!

Brian {Hamilton Kelly} (Email Removed) "Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu le loisir de la faire plus courte."
Blaise Pascal, /Lettres Provinciales/, 1657
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