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I’m confused about which word to use (Each or Every) in the following sentences. Could you help me in selecting the best or the only one choice?
I know, I know... I've put 9 sentences but I have more than 9 doubts!

1) This family has an ill son and (each, every) parent worries about their child.
2) Every (each) time I phoned her there was not reply.
3) I’m happy, my little child ate (every; each) bit of his meal.
4) I enjoyed (every; each) minute of this wonderful movie.
5) I know (every; each) word of his songs by heart.
6) (Every; Each) time my father see me, he give me one grand.
7) She was (every; each) bit as rude as her sister.
8) The airline takes (every; each) possible precaution to ensure the safety of its passengers.
9) Robert had to pick up (every; each) last bit of paper from the floor.
Excuse me for the "packet" of sentences,
Eladio
Comments  
Please make your own choices first, Eladio, and then we will be happy to review them.
I would like to say that even in those cases I've selected one of the two choices, I couldn't explain why the other one isn't correct.
1) This family has an ill son and EACH parent worries about their child.
2) EVERY OR EACH time I phoned her there was not reply.
3) I’m happy, my little child ate EVERY OR EACH bit of his meal.
4) I enjoyed EVERY minute of this wonderful movie.
5) I know EVERY word of his songs by heart.
6) EVERY OR EACH time my father see me, he give me one grand.
7) She was EVERY OR EACH bit as rude as her sister.
8) The airline takes EVERY possible precaution to ensure the safety of its passengers.
9) Robert had to pick up EVERY OR EACH last bit of paper from the floor.
I've done my best, sorry.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
'Each' are individual ones, and 'every' are all (more than 2) of them. Often, they are interchangeable. Some uses are idiomatic.

1) This family has an ill son and EACH parent worries about their child. (only two parents)
2) EVERY OR EACH time I phoned her there was no reply. (both OK)
3) I’m happy, my little child ate EVERY bit of his meal. (all)
4) I enjoyed EVERY/EACH minute of this wonderful movie. (both OK, but EVERY better)
5) I know EVERY word of his songs by heart. (both OK, but EVERY better)
6) EVERY OR EACH time my father see me, he give me one grand. (both OK)
7) She was EVERY bit as rude as her sister. (idiom!)
8) The airline takes EVERY possible precaution to ensure the safety of its passengers. (all)
9) Robert had to pick up EVERY last bit of paper from the floor. (idiom)
THANKS A LOT MrMicawber, TWO MORE THINGS:
1) IF I WRITE:
EVERY PARENT WORRIES ABOUT THEIR CHILDREN
IS THIS SENTENCE CORRECT BECAUSE I AM REFERING TO "ALL" PARENTS OF THE WORLD?
2) WHY IN 4, 5 EVERY IS BETTER?
ELADIO
Hi Eladio. Ease up on the capital letters, will you?-- they should be placed only at the beginning of sentences and proper nouns.

(1) 'Every parent worries about their children' is right for the reason you give, but questionable as formal English according to some: 'parent' is singular. 'Every parent worries about his/her children' or 'All parents worry about their children' will allow you to escape from the Grammar Police.

(2) Grammatically either works fine in #4 and #5, but since the implication is that 'all of the movie' and 'all of the lyrics' are being considered, 'every' as the inclusive determiner is a better choice.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
A: (1) 'Every parent worries about their children' is right for the reason you give, but questionable as formal English according to some: 'parent' is singular.

B: 'every' are all (more than 2) of them.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>.

JT: There seems to be a contradiction between A & B, Mr M. Surely 'Every parent' can't possibly mean just one parent. It must mean, as you stated, [possibly in an ungrammatical fashion for 'formal'] " 'every' are all of them".

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Is there a possibility that 'every' is more the normal neutral and 'each' is more emphatic and 'each and every' even more emphatic? Of course there are other considerations, idiomatic being one already mentioned.